All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Cervical Cancer Messages in Women’s Magazines: A Content Analysis Grounded in the Extended Parallel Process Model
Unformatted Document Text:  Cervical Cancer 4 disease, perceptions of their susceptibility to the disease, and finally perceptions that the recommended response (obtaining a pap test) is both effective at addressing the threat and that they are capable of performing the recommended response. Literature Review Content analyses of health information in women’s magazines are few, and tend to cover smoking-related health hazards, or specifically examine breast or colon cancer (Andsager & Powers, 1999, 2001; Gerlach, Marino, Weed, & Hoffman-Goetz, 1997; Clark, 1992; Kessler, 1989; Weston & Ruggiero, 1985/86). Each study notes the conspicuous lack of coverage of women’s health issues in the magazines examined, though the trend for some diseases such as breast cancer seems to be reversing (Gerlach et al., 1997). Nevertheless, Andsager and Powers (1999) note that “the amount of discussion of breast cancer may not be as important as how it is discussed” (p. 533, emphasis added). Research shows that women’s magazines tend to provide slightly more balanced coverage than do other media outlets, though the medium is certainly not without its problems (Andsager & Powers, 1999). On one hand, women’s magazines have been criticized for couching pressing health concerns in traditional ‘feminine’ frames. In many instances, concerns with looks, diet, and family care take precedent over complete and relevant discussion of serious health issues (Signorielli, 1993). One editor pointed out that her magazine tended to avoid ‘controversial’ issues for fear of offending the audience (Kessler, 1989). On the other hand, women’s magazines have been found to focus more on coping with the disease and its effects than do news magazines and newspapers (Andsager & Powers, 1999 & 2001). While research shows that women’s magazines frame cancer-related issues in a more slightly more balanced fashion than news magazines and newspapers, no study has attempted to specifically examine

Authors: Brown, Colleen. and Lewis, Melissa.
first   previous   Page 4 of 35   next   last



background image
Cervical Cancer 4
disease, perceptions of their susceptibility to the disease, and finally perceptions that the
recommended response (obtaining a pap test) is both effective at addressing the threat and that
they are capable of performing the recommended response.
Literature Review
Content analyses of health information in women’s magazines are few, and tend to cover
smoking-related health hazards, or specifically examine breast or colon cancer (Andsager &
Powers, 1999, 2001; Gerlach, Marino, Weed, & Hoffman-Goetz, 1997; Clark, 1992; Kessler,
1989; Weston & Ruggiero, 1985/86). Each study notes the conspicuous lack of coverage of
women’s health issues in the magazines examined, though the trend for some diseases such as
breast cancer seems to be reversing (Gerlach et al., 1997). Nevertheless, Andsager and Powers
(1999) note that “the amount of discussion of breast cancer may not be as important as how it is
discussed” (p. 533, emphasis added).
Research shows that women’s magazines tend to provide slightly more balanced
coverage than do other media outlets, though the medium is certainly not without its problems
(Andsager & Powers, 1999). On one hand, women’s magazines have been criticized for
couching pressing health concerns in traditional ‘feminine’ frames. In many instances, concerns
with looks, diet, and family care take precedent over complete and relevant discussion of serious
health issues (Signorielli, 1993). One editor pointed out that her magazine tended to avoid
‘controversial’ issues for fear of offending the audience (Kessler, 1989). On the other hand,
women’s magazines have been found to focus more on coping with the disease and its effects
than do news magazines and newspapers (Andsager & Powers, 1999 & 2001). While research
shows that women’s magazines frame cancer-related issues in a more slightly more balanced
fashion than news magazines and newspapers, no study has attempted to specifically examine


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.