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Auditory Interfaces as a Sign System: An Application of Peircean Semiotics to Human-Computer Interaction

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Abstract:

The purpose of this paper is to theorize auditory interfaces as a sign system. This paper compares the three types of auditory interfaces in personal computing environments: verbal messages (speech sounds), earcons (musical sounds) and auditory icons (natural sounds). Relying on Peirce¡¯s theory of signs, especially the trichotomies of Firstness, Secondness, and Thirdness, we conceptualized verbal messages as a ¡°dicent symbol legisign,¡± earcons as a ¡°dicent indexical legisign,¡± and auditory icons as a ¡°remantic iconic sinsign.¡± As signs, auditory interfaces require certain amounts of mental efforts to be produced and consumed. Relying on the theories of sign production, I argue that the three auditory interfaces would require different levels of mental efforts for interpretation: verbal messages are easiest to interpret, followed by earcons and auditory icons. The implication is that verbal messages would offer the highest usability among the three auditory interfaces.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

sign (121), auditori (92), interfac (78), sound (65), comput (62), use (45), icon (40), user (38), interpret (38), system (37), peirc (32), object (32), human (30), earcon (29), music (28), semiot (25), messag (25), design (25), usabl (22), hci (21), three (21),

Author's Keywords:

Interfaces, Auditory interfaces, Human-computer interaction, sign, semiotics
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MLA Citation:

Nam, Yoon Jae. "Auditory Interfaces as a Sign System: An Application of Peircean Semiotics to Human-Computer Interaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111572_index.html>

APA Citation:

Nam, Y. , 2003-05-27 "Auditory Interfaces as a Sign System: An Application of Peircean Semiotics to Human-Computer Interaction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111572_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to theorize auditory interfaces as a sign system. This paper compares the three types of auditory interfaces in personal computing environments: verbal messages (speech sounds), earcons (musical sounds) and auditory icons (natural sounds). Relying on Peirce¡¯s theory of signs, especially the trichotomies of Firstness, Secondness, and Thirdness, we conceptualized verbal messages as a ¡°dicent symbol legisign,¡± earcons as a ¡°dicent indexical legisign,¡± and auditory icons as a ¡°remantic iconic sinsign.¡± As signs, auditory interfaces require certain amounts of mental efforts to be produced and consumed. Relying on the theories of sign production, I argue that the three auditory interfaces would require different levels of mental efforts for interpretation: verbal messages are easiest to interpret, followed by earcons and auditory icons. The implication is that verbal messages would offer the highest usability among the three auditory interfaces.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 26
Word count: 5953
Text sample:
Auditory Interfaces as a Sign System: An Application of Peircean Semiotics to Human-Computer Interaction Auditory Interfaces as a Sign System: An Application of Peircean Semiotics to Human-Computer Interaction Abstract The purpose of this paper is to theorize auditory interfaces as a sign system. This paper compares the three types of auditory interfaces in personal computing environments: verbal messages (speech sounds) earcons (musical sounds) and auditory icons (natural sounds). Relying on Peirce’s theory of signs especially the trichotomies of Firstness
In Cook P.R. (Ed.). Music cognition and computerized sound. Cambridge MA: The MIT Press.Cambridge: The MIT Press. Preece J. (1994). Human-computer interaction. Wokingham England: Addoson-Wesley. Reeves B. & Nass C. (1996). The Media Equation. New York: Cambridge University Press. Shneiderman B. (1998). Designing the User Interface. (3rd ed.). Reading Mass: Addison Wesley Longman. Turino T. (1999). Signs of imagination Identity and Experience: A Pician Semiotics theory of Music. Ethnomusicology Vol.43 NO.2 221-255. Wixon D. (1997). The usability Engineering Framework


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