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Buddhist Public Relations Model for Thai Community Development: Theoretical and Practical Implications
Unformatted Document Text:  Buddhist Public Relations - ICA-15-11634 15 production of well-grounded, rich descriptions and explanations of processes in identifiable local contexts. The objective is to interpret the social interaction of community actors by examining the “inside story,” through processes of deep attentiveness and of narrative understanding. In addition, in co-operative framework there is a need to take into consideration the interaction between those involved by regarding each individual as a co-subject or co-actor in the social research setting. Reason (1994) states that people involved in the community-building context become “co-subjects,” or “co-actors,” in the “co-created meaning process” (Heath, 2001). However qualitative scholars assure us that ethnographic research can be subjective by intent (Arnst, 1996; Simbulan, 1985) simply because of their interests in human inquiry into social reality, through observation, sensitivity to participants’ concerns, descriptive data, non-standardized instrumentation, a holistic perspective, and a search for underlying themes or patterns. To reduce the subjective problems of traditional ethnographic research, collaborative action research (Oja & Smulyan, 1989) suggests that the researcher needs to collaborate with and learn from the community. In this sense, the researcher becomes a co-actor who has a direct, articulated social purpose. In collaborative action research, co-actors focus on the products of relationships and shared meaning, rather than on their own individual participation. The collaborative action approach can help co-subjects discover the interrelations among the various systems and subsystems in the community or program under study. Collaborative action research focuses on sociocultural processes in which meaning is constructed, shared, and reconstructed by the co-actors of social groups in the course of everyday interaction (Oja & Smulyan, 1989). Through this process, co- actors from both inside and outside organizations—who, it should be noted, can hold

Authors: Hanpongpandh, Peeraya.
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Buddhist Public Relations - ICA-15-11634
15
production of well-grounded, rich descriptions and explanations of processes in
identifiable local contexts. The objective is to interpret the social interaction of
community actors by examining the “inside story,” through processes of deep
attentiveness and of narrative understanding. In addition, in co-operative framework
there is a need to take into consideration the interaction between those involved by
regarding each individual as a co-subject or co-actor in the social research setting.
Reason (1994) states that people involved in the community-building context become
“co-subjects,” or “co-actors,” in the “co-created meaning process” (Heath, 2001).
However qualitative scholars assure us that ethnographic research can be
subjective by intent (Arnst, 1996; Simbulan, 1985) simply because of their interests in
human inquiry into social reality, through observation, sensitivity to participants’
concerns, descriptive data, non-standardized instrumentation, a holistic perspective,
and a search for underlying themes or patterns. To reduce the subjective problems of
traditional ethnographic research, collaborative action research (Oja & Smulyan,
1989) suggests that the researcher needs to collaborate with and learn from the
community. In this sense, the researcher becomes a co-actor who has a direct,
articulated social purpose. In collaborative action research, co-actors focus on the
products of relationships and shared meaning, rather than on their own individual
participation. The collaborative action approach can help co-subjects discover the
interrelations among the various systems and subsystems in the community or
program under study.
Collaborative action research focuses on sociocultural processes in which
meaning is constructed, shared, and reconstructed by the co-actors of social groups in
the course of everyday interaction (Oja & Smulyan, 1989). Through this process, co-
actors from both inside and outside organizations—who, it should be noted, can hold


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