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Buddhist Public Relations Model for Thai Community Development: Theoretical and Practical Implications
Unformatted Document Text:  Buddhist Public Relations - ICA-15-11634 19 an important part in developing the “telling” practices (Goffman, 1989) of Buddhist public relations for the community development. My narrative understandings focused on what was happening in the heart of each community and how the sense of community has been restored, developed, and sustained. I employ several measures recommended by Carspecken (1996) and Lincoln and Guba (1985) to explain techniques of supporting validity claims. First, I triangulate my study by applying more than my own senses when compiling the record. I usually take notes with a tape recorder running, and if possible, have other observers take notes with me so that our records can be compared. I also take photographs when I attend and participate in community activities. In addition, the integration of local intellectuals’ autobiographical narratives and documentation related to the CB co-operative and its locales provides me a wider perspective. Second, I use a flexible observation schedule to interrupt unconscious biases in attention. And finally, I use peer-debriefing and member checks to verify possible biases in attention and vocabulary. My peer debriefer is a colleague who also teaches public relations and is a public officer at the Amnaj Charoen (AC) community. We shared a common interest in public relations and community development projects in general. I also stay in contact with a few local intellectuals after a set of field notes has been compiled to share personal interests and ideas about community development strategies and the role of public relations in such a context. Having undertaken a preliminary study during June and July 1999, I have been well exposed to and have become familiar with the situation and problems of community development in North-East Thailand. Exogenously, there is currently extensive research being conducted on community development from both the public and private sectors in Thailand, which has facilitated the process of my study. This is

Authors: Hanpongpandh, Peeraya.
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Buddhist Public Relations - ICA-15-11634
19
an important part in developing the “telling” practices (Goffman, 1989) of Buddhist
public relations for the community development. My narrative understandings
focused on what was happening in the heart of each community and how the sense of
community has been restored, developed, and sustained.
I employ several measures recommended by Carspecken (1996) and Lincoln
and Guba (1985) to explain techniques of supporting validity claims. First, I
triangulate my study by applying more than my own senses when compiling the
record. I usually take notes with a tape recorder running, and if possible, have other
observers take notes with me so that our records can be compared. I also take
photographs when I attend and participate in community activities. In addition, the
integration of local intellectuals’ autobiographical narratives and documentation
related to the CB co-operative and its locales provides me a wider perspective.
Second, I use a flexible observation schedule to interrupt unconscious biases
in attention. And finally, I use peer-debriefing and member checks to verify possible
biases in attention and vocabulary. My peer debriefer is a colleague who also teaches
public relations and is a public officer at the Amnaj Charoen (AC) community. We
shared a common interest in public relations and community development projects in
general. I also stay in contact with a few local intellectuals after a set of field notes
has been compiled to share personal interests and ideas about community
development strategies and the role of public relations in such a context.
Having undertaken a preliminary study during June and July 1999, I have been
well exposed to and have become familiar with the situation and problems of
community development in North-East Thailand. Exogenously, there is currently
extensive research being conducted on community development from both the public
and private sectors in Thailand, which has facilitated the process of my study. This is


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