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Buddhist Public Relations Model for Thai Community Development: Theoretical and Practical Implications
Unformatted Document Text:  Buddhist Public Relations - ICA-15-11634 2 “Four” models of public relations (J. Grunig & Hunt, 1984), the “Excellence” public relations (J. Grunig & L. Grunig, 1992), and the modernist approach to organization (Burrell & Morgan, 1979; J. Grunig, 1976; Hayles, 1982). Conceptually, J. Grunig (2001) values public relations as a “management function” that establishes and maintains “symmetrical relations,” or a mutual understanding between the organization and the public. Paradoxically, most excellent research projects have been done mainly in service to big business and state agencies (Karlberg, 1996). In addition, J. Grunig’s dominant view accepts the modernist, or functionalist, approach to organization in which public relations practitioners give priority to the organization’s self-interest, economic orientation, and tangible contributions. This inherent managerial bias seeks to minimize complexity and differences in search of consensus and symmetry (Holtzhausen & Voto, 2002). In recent years, contemporary public relations scholars have encountered a new paradigm in which the dominant approaches are being challenged, refined, and elaborated, while alternative theories (i.e., critical, cultural, rhetorical, postmodern, and interpretive) make their strides into the field (Dozier & Lauzen, 2000; Holtzhausen, 2000; Karlberg, 1996; Murphy, 1999). In relation to that, my research aims to study 1) how the alternative orientation to the modernist approach in public relations theory comes to light in a non-Western country, like Thailand, 2) how the dominant public relations can be reconceptualized to serve the broader segments of Thai population in general, community-based organizations in particular, and 3) what constitutes an adequate theory of this alternative public relations. For several years, I have developed my interest in an adequate theory and practice of public relations in the integration process from the sociocultural approach. In my previous research, I argued that the modernist integration themes, such as

Authors: Hanpongpandh, Peeraya.
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Buddhist Public Relations - ICA-15-11634
2
“Four” models of public relations (J. Grunig & Hunt, 1984), the “Excellence” public
relations (J. Grunig & L. Grunig, 1992), and the modernist approach to organization
(Burrell & Morgan, 1979; J. Grunig, 1976; Hayles, 1982).
Conceptually, J. Grunig (2001) values public relations as a “management
function” that establishes and maintains “symmetrical relations,” or a mutual
understanding between the organization and the public. Paradoxically, most excellent
research projects have been done mainly in service to big business and state agencies
(Karlberg, 1996). In addition, J. Grunig’s dominant view accepts the modernist, or
functionalist, approach to organization in which public relations practitioners give
priority to the organization’s self-interest, economic orientation, and tangible
contributions. This inherent managerial bias seeks to minimize complexity and
differences in search of consensus and symmetry (Holtzhausen & Voto, 2002).
In recent years, contemporary public relations scholars have encountered a
new paradigm in which the dominant approaches are being challenged, refined, and
elaborated, while alternative theories (i.e., critical, cultural, rhetorical, postmodern,
and interpretive) make their strides into the field (Dozier & Lauzen, 2000;
Holtzhausen, 2000; Karlberg, 1996; Murphy, 1999). In relation to that, my research
aims to study 1) how the alternative orientation to the modernist approach in public
relations theory comes to light in a non-Western country, like Thailand, 2) how the
dominant public relations can be reconceptualized to serve the broader segments of
Thai population in general, community-based organizations in particular, and 3) what
constitutes an adequate theory of this alternative public relations.
For several years, I have developed my interest in an adequate theory and
practice of public relations in the integration process from the sociocultural approach.
In my previous research, I argued that the modernist integration themes, such as


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