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Buddhist Public Relations Model for Thai Community Development: Theoretical and Practical Implications
Unformatted Document Text:  Buddhist Public Relations - ICA-15-11634 24 The reintegrated narrative analysis of CB co-operative and Isan civic network elicits that the Buddhism-based soft approach works best in the “dialogic complexity” setting (Baxter & Montgomery, 1996) that composes the sustainable interplay of different voices. In this extent, the dialogic complexity brings forward the contexts of “community culture” and “social relationships” to public relations discipline. As it is found, community culture that displays the full range of humanistic essences tends to bring about a healthy environment, mutual caring, loving families, vibrant cultures, shared values, self-reliant community, and cultural networks. In a nutshell, these essences constitutes a mutual learning and self-reflective community that knows how to enhance its harmony, mindfulness, and inspiration for social and cultural change. Accordingly, the community cultures of the two organizations under study are likely to construct the dialogic view of social relationships. The on-going social interaction process and the shared understanding, which captures the spirit of Buddhist values, are at the core of the dialectic social relationships. The new context of social relationships lives the Buddhism-based soft approach out at both individual and societal levels. In the course of community development efforts, CB co-operative and Isan civic network perform the fostering and catalyzing role in developing community enterprises. They try to collaborate with social agents from other community networks to create a sense of community belonging, self-awareness, and learning from the experiences of each other. In addition, they play roles of liaison to build up collaborative alliances among communities, external institutions, and governmental agencies. The collaborative alliances will lead those involved to the “reciprocal relationships.” The lesson learned from the case study reflects that the true value of public relations should go beyond the understanding of a relationship as a transaction

Authors: Hanpongpandh, Peeraya.
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Buddhist Public Relations - ICA-15-11634
24
The reintegrated narrative analysis of CB co-operative and Isan civic network
elicits that the Buddhism-based soft approach works best in the “dialogic complexity”
setting (Baxter & Montgomery, 1996) that composes the sustainable interplay of
different voices. In this extent, the dialogic complexity brings forward the contexts of
“community culture” and “social relationships” to public relations discipline. As it is
found, community culture that displays the full range of humanistic essences tends to
bring about a healthy environment, mutual caring, loving families, vibrant cultures,
shared values, self-reliant community, and cultural networks. In a nutshell, these
essences constitutes a mutual learning and self-reflective community that knows how
to enhance its harmony, mindfulness, and inspiration for social and cultural change.
Accordingly, the community cultures of the two organizations under study are
likely to construct the dialogic view of social relationships. The on-going social
interaction process and the shared understanding, which captures the spirit of
Buddhist values, are at the core of the dialectic social relationships. The new context
of social relationships lives the Buddhism-based soft approach out at both individual
and societal levels. In the course of community development efforts, CB co-operative
and Isan civic network perform the fostering and catalyzing role in developing
community enterprises. They try to collaborate with social agents from other
community networks to create a sense of community belonging, self-awareness, and
learning from the experiences of each other. In addition, they play roles of liaison to
build up collaborative alliances among communities, external institutions, and
governmental agencies. The collaborative alliances will lead those involved to the
“reciprocal relationships.”
The lesson learned from the case study reflects that the true value of public
relations should go beyond the understanding of a relationship as a transaction


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