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Buddhist Public Relations Model for Thai Community Development: Theoretical and Practical Implications
Unformatted Document Text:  Buddhist Public Relations - ICA-15-11634 3 integrated marketing communications (IMC), marketing public relations (MPR), integrated public relations (IPR), or integrated communication (IC), have lost a considerable amount of sociocultural context by overemphasizing individualistic and instrumental motives while neglecting important ethical, moral, and spiritual aspects. These modernist integration themes fail to recognize the true societal justification for public relations (Martinson, 2001). I contend that the integration themes, which have been the sole domain of “commercial and state communications” (Karlberg, 1996, p. 266), should be “reconstructed” (P. Hanpongpandh, 2000a, 2002a, 2002b) to enhance the social applications of public relations for the broader public interest. About a decade ago, Kruckeberg and Starck (1988) pointed out the need for a holistic framework and dialogical process in public relations. Yet many American public relations practitioners say that Kruckeberg and Starck’s community-building approach is far removed from what they actually do. In my research, I attempt to vindicate Kruckeberg and Starck’s challenge by undertaking the sociocultural perspective that looks beyond a solely Western modernist approach to organization. In particular, I initiate a need to understand the true societal justification for public relations theory and practice in Thai economic, political, social, and cultural contexts. The purpose of this research is three-fold. First, I develop a conceptual- building of the alternative voice of “Buddhist public relations” through the buranagarn, or the relational integration, framework and Buddhist interpretive perspective. Second, I take a step forward to verify the proposed concept of Buddhist public relations in the community development context through the integrated research method. Third, I discuss the key important findings and develop these findings into an operational model of Buddhist public relations for Thai community

Authors: Hanpongpandh, Peeraya.
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Buddhist Public Relations - ICA-15-11634
3
integrated marketing communications (IMC), marketing public relations (MPR),
integrated public relations (IPR), or integrated communication (IC), have lost a
considerable amount of sociocultural context by overemphasizing individualistic and
instrumental motives while neglecting important ethical, moral, and spiritual aspects.
These modernist integration themes fail to recognize the true societal justification for
public relations (Martinson, 2001). I contend that the integration themes, which have
been the sole domain of “commercial and state communications” (Karlberg, 1996, p.
266), should be “reconstructed” (P. Hanpongpandh, 2000a, 2002a, 2002b) to enhance
the social applications of public relations for the broader public interest.
About a decade ago, Kruckeberg and Starck (1988) pointed out the need for a
holistic framework and dialogical process in public relations. Yet many American
public relations practitioners say that Kruckeberg and Starck’s community-building
approach is far removed from what they actually do. In my research, I attempt to
vindicate Kruckeberg and Starck’s challenge by undertaking the sociocultural
perspective that looks beyond a solely Western modernist approach to organization.
In particular, I initiate a need to understand the true societal justification for public
relations theory and practice in Thai economic, political, social, and cultural contexts.
The purpose of this research is three-fold. First, I develop a conceptual-
building of the alternative voice of “Buddhist public relations” through the
buranagarn, or the relational integration, framework and Buddhist interpretive
perspective. Second, I take a step forward to verify the proposed concept of Buddhist
public relations in the community development context through the integrated
research method. Third, I discuss the key important findings and develop these
findings into an operational model of Buddhist public relations for Thai community


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