All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Buddhist Public Relations Model for Thai Community Development: Theoretical and Practical Implications
Unformatted Document Text:  Buddhist Public Relations - ICA-15-11634 5 been regarded as an “ideology” or a “form of maintaining organizational power structures” (Althusser, 1971). Its purpose is to make people think alike, and then assert power over society. In contrast, postmodern scholars propose people’s strategies and individual power networks, or micropolitics, to counterbalance the ideological domination, or macropolitics (Baudrillard, 1975, 1981; Best & Kellner, 1991; Deleuze & Guattari, 1983; Haltzhausen & Voto, 2002). The understanding of symmetry and consensus concept in dominant public relations theory is currently challenged by the postmodern concepts of dissensus and dissymmetry (Haltzhausen, 2000). Creedon (1993) defined dissymmetry as “symmetry in different directions rather than as a lack of symmetry.” In the same manner, the idea that postmodernists attach to the concept of dissensus is not the lack of consensus, but compromise and negotiation through difference and opposition. Through dissensus, public relations will promote new thinking and new solutions to problems, thus contributing to real changes in the micropolitics of marginalized and powerless people, and the broader society. As change arrives, there are increasing numbers of qualitative scholars who begin to recognize the value of viewing relationships as dialogue and dialectical processes, or a dynamic tie of contradictions, a ceaseless interplay between unity and differences. Montgomery and Baxter (1998) hold that relational dialectics differ from monologic (a concept of sameness/unidimensional) and dualistic views (a concept of polarity and binary). Relational dialectics take into account the importance of “the ongoing, indeterminant interplay of complex, contradictory elements” (Montgomery & Baxter, 1998, p. 159). Relational dialectics see power relationships through the lens of a culturally constructive effort, an ongoing process, and the process of discovery. Bakhtin’s (1984) concept of dialogue also supports this point. He stated

Authors: Hanpongpandh, Peeraya.
first   previous   Page 5 of 39   next   last



background image
Buddhist Public Relations - ICA-15-11634
5
been regarded as an “ideology” or a “form of maintaining organizational power
structures” (Althusser, 1971). Its purpose is to make people think alike, and then
assert power over society. In contrast, postmodern scholars propose people’s
strategies and individual power networks, or micropolitics, to counterbalance the
ideological domination, or macropolitics (Baudrillard, 1975, 1981; Best & Kellner,
1991; Deleuze & Guattari, 1983; Haltzhausen & Voto, 2002).
The understanding of symmetry and consensus concept in dominant public
relations theory is currently challenged by the postmodern concepts of dissensus and
dissymmetry (Haltzhausen, 2000). Creedon (1993) defined dissymmetry as
“symmetry in different directions rather than as a lack of symmetry.” In the same
manner, the idea that postmodernists attach to the concept of dissensus is not the lack
of consensus, but compromise and negotiation through difference and opposition.
Through dissensus, public relations will promote new thinking and new solutions to
problems, thus contributing to real changes in the micropolitics of marginalized and
powerless people, and the broader society.
As change arrives, there are increasing numbers of qualitative scholars who
begin to recognize the value of viewing relationships as dialogue and dialectical
processes, or a dynamic tie of contradictions, a ceaseless interplay between unity and
differences. Montgomery and Baxter (1998) hold that relational dialectics differ from
monologic (a concept of sameness/unidimensional) and dualistic views (a concept of
polarity and binary). Relational dialectics take into account the importance of “the
ongoing, indeterminant interplay of complex, contradictory elements” (Montgomery
& Baxter, 1998, p. 159). Relational dialectics see power relationships through the
lens of a culturally constructive effort, an ongoing process, and the process of
discovery. Bakhtin’s (1984) concept of dialogue also supports this point. He stated


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 5 of 39   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.