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Auditory Interfaces as a Sign System: An Application of Peircean Semiotics to Human-Computer Interaction
Unformatted Document Text:  YW experience. We hear a sound and perceive it. Percept that we hear cannot be shared with and compared with others. The percept’ should be reproduced as something exchangeable: it must be a ‘perception for others’ or a ‘social percept.’ Therefore, we need another human action that produces a sign from a percept: signifying. To use the sound sources in computer system, auditory percept must be a sign which is not one’s own but exchangeable thing with others. Basically design of computer interfaces aims for improving usability of all users who use them, not specific one. All the auditory interfaces, that is, verbal message, earcon or auditory icon should fulfill with this aim, which means auditory interfaces must be designed to be understood by all users. Therefore, how auditory interfaces are designed well by programmer or system designer is how sounds are helpful for users to use them as signs (Figure. 6). The sign is both a human produced and an objectivation of human subjectivity. It should produce meaning for others. It is only by the action of ‘interpreting.’ Interpreting is admitting and sharing other’s percepts as my own through meditation. It implies that the referent of a sign is not the material object but the percept. Signs as auditory interfaces must be interpreted as suitable things for operating a computer purposefully on the environment of HCI. All the signs as auditory interfaces passing through first and second stages (perceiving and signifying) can be interpreted differently. If a sign as auditory interfaces is designed well, it cannot be interpreted as something that is far from actual operation. But there may be a difference of the degree of interpretation. Some auditory interfaces as signs are good for using a computer system. They convey intention of programmer precisely and make users operate a computer system usefully, effectively, and easily. But some auditory interfaces would rather be

Authors: Nam, Yoon Jae.
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YW
experience. We hear a sound and perceive it. Percept that we hear cannot be shared with and
compared with others.
The percept’ should be reproduced as something exchangeable: it must be a
‘perception for others’ or a ‘social percept.’ Therefore, we need another human action that
produces a sign from a percept: signifying. To use the sound sources in computer system,
auditory percept must be a sign which is not one’s own but exchangeable thing with others.
Basically design of computer interfaces aims for improving usability of all users who use them,
not specific one. All the auditory interfaces, that is, verbal message, earcon or auditory icon
should fulfill with this aim, which means auditory interfaces must be designed to be
understood by all users. Therefore, how auditory interfaces are designed well by programmer
or system designer is how sounds are helpful for users to use them as signs (Figure. 6).
The sign is both a human produced and an objectivation of human subjectivity. It
should produce meaning for others. It is only by the action of ‘interpreting.’ Interpreting is
admitting and sharing other’s percepts as my own through meditation. It implies that the
referent of a sign is not the material object but the percept. Signs as auditory interfaces must be
interpreted as suitable things for operating a computer purposefully on the environment of
HCI. All the signs as auditory interfaces passing through first and second stages (perceiving
and signifying) can be interpreted differently. If a sign as auditory interfaces is designed well,
it cannot be interpreted as something that is far from actual operation. But there may be a
difference of the degree of interpretation. Some auditory interfaces as signs are good for using
a computer system. They convey intention of programmer precisely and make users operate a
computer system usefully, effectively, and easily. But some auditory interfaces would rather be


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