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Auditory Interfaces as a Sign System: An Application of Peircean Semiotics to Human-Computer Interaction
Unformatted Document Text:  Y Auditory Interfaces as a Sign System: An Application of Peircean Semiotics to Human-Computer Interaction G Computer is not just a simple medium processing and storing information. We watch movies, listen to music, play games, and communicate with others. Such ubiquitous use of computer has led researchers to interests in design of computer programs. Human-computer interaction (HCI) is the study of the process, dialogues, and actions that a user employs to interact with a computer in a given environment (Preece, 1994). Most HCI studies have focused on visual presentation of computer applications such as fonts, icons, buttons, and scroll bar designs; and arrangement of application elements on displays. That is, visual perception of computer users has been the most prevalent issues in HCI studies. However, auditory perception is also an important facet of studying HCI and HCI design. Auditory sense can be regarded as a major supplement sense to visual sense Therefore, HCI study should expand its interests beyond visual interface. If auditory perceptions are as much as important as visual perceptions, usability measures – i.e., effectiveness and efficiency measurement of computer use – auditory perceptions and presentation should be also included in the usability studies. Then a question is what kinds of auditory interfaces are considered to have a better usability? The paper adopts Peircean semiotic theory in order to answer this question; and develop better ways of designing auditory HCI. The paper is organized in a following order. First, it discusses the importance of auditory HCI design; and suggests that three different kinds of auditory can be adopted from Peicean semiotic theory – i.e., verbal messages, earcons, and auditory icons. Then, this paper analyzes these auditory interfaces as signs from Peircean semiotic theory. According to Peirce,

Authors: Nam, Yoon Jae.
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Y
Auditory Interfaces as a Sign System:
An Application of Peircean Semiotics to Human-Computer Interaction
G
Computer is not just a simple medium processing and storing information. We watch
movies, listen to music, play games, and communicate with others. Such ubiquitous use of
computer has led researchers to interests in design of computer programs. Human-computer
interaction (HCI) is the study of the process, dialogues, and actions that a user employs to
interact with a computer in a given environment (Preece, 1994). Most HCI studies have
focused on visual presentation of computer applications such as fonts, icons, buttons, and
scroll bar designs; and arrangement of application elements on displays. That is, visual
perception of computer users has been the most prevalent issues in HCI studies. However,
auditory perception is also an important facet of studying HCI and HCI design. Auditory
sense can be regarded as a major supplement sense to visual sense Therefore, HCI study
should expand its interests beyond visual interface. If auditory perceptions are as much as
important as visual perceptions, usability measures – i.e., effectiveness and efficiency
measurement of computer use – auditory perceptions and presentation should be also
included in the usability studies. Then a question is what kinds of auditory interfaces are
considered to have a better usability? The paper adopts Peircean semiotic theory in order to
answer this question; and develop better ways of designing auditory HCI.
The paper is organized in a following order. First, it discusses the importance of
auditory HCI design; and suggests that three different kinds of auditory can be adopted from
Peicean semiotic theory – i.e., verbal messages, earcons, and auditory icons. Then, this paper
analyzes these auditory interfaces as signs from Peircean semiotic theory. According to Peirce,


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