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A Frog in a Well: People's Daily and its Geographic Landscape
Unformatted Document Text:  ICA-2-10365 A frog in a well: People’s Daily and its Geographic Landscape 5 was probably right in a sense when he observed “ Chinese population at large has better things to do than get involved in the rest of the world’s problems”. But what he might not understand is that Chinese people painstakingly tried to detach themselves from any connection with the “capitalist” world. This effort included ignoring foreign news. As a consequence of geographic, historic as well as ideological reasons, China isolated and excluded itself from the rest of the world until the late 1970s. Dramatic changes took place since then. People’s Republic of China set up diplomatic relationship with most of the countries and regained its membership to the United Nations. When economic reforms and an open policy were adopted for building “socialism with Chinese characteristic”, transformation of a command economy to a market economy and integration with the world markets of trade and investment became the nation’s priority. Central as well as local governments are currently offering beneficial policies to attract foreign trade and investment. Most recently, China’s WTO entry and Beijing successfully bid for holding the Olympics all point to the change. The nation is intent on opening itself to the outside world. Coming from such a such background, it’s meaningful to examine how the outside world is portrayed to domestic audience, which has been detached from foreign contact for centuries. Countless academic research has proven that international news is an important tool in shaping public perception of nations including their attitudes towards foreign countries (Mcnelly J. and Izcaray F, 1986; Perry D.P. 1987; Schmitt J. 1992). The research question for this study is---How do the media coverage of the outside world as the nation intends to integrate itself to global community?

Authors: Chen, Danielle. and Yan, Xiaoying.
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ICA-2-10365 A frog in a well: People’s Daily and its Geographic Landscape
5
was probably right in a sense when he observed “ Chinese population at large has better
things to do than get involved in the rest of the world’s problems”. But what he might not
understand is that Chinese people painstakingly tried to detach themselves from any
connection with the “capitalist” world. This effort included ignoring foreign news. As a
consequence of geographic, historic as well as ideological reasons, China isolated and
excluded itself from the rest of the world until the late 1970s.
Dramatic changes took place since then. People’s Republic of China set up
diplomatic relationship with most of the countries and regained its membership to the
United Nations. When economic reforms and an open policy were adopted for building
“socialism with Chinese characteristic”, transformation of a command economy to a
market economy and integration with the world markets of trade and investment became
the nation’s priority. Central as well as local governments are currently offering
beneficial policies to attract foreign trade and investment. Most recently, China’s WTO
entry and Beijing successfully bid for holding the Olympics all point to the change. The
nation is intent on opening itself to the outside world.
Coming from such a such background, it’s meaningful to examine how the outside
world is portrayed to domestic audience, which has been detached from foreign contact
for centuries. Countless academic research has proven that international news is an
important tool in shaping public perception of nations including their attitudes towards
foreign countries (Mcnelly J. and Izcaray F, 1986; Perry D.P. 1987; Schmitt J. 1992). The
research question for this study is---How do the media coverage of the outside world as
the nation intends to integrate itself to global community?


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