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Reflections on the Past, Questions of the Future--Public Service Broadcasting: A Case Study of The Bahamas Broadcasting System,
Unformatted Document Text:  12 reception in the Out Islands. However, a station in Santiago de Cuba began operating on the 640 frequency and interfered with the transmission of ZNS to the Out Islands. The frequency problem resulted in Hodgson’s visit to Cuba and the United States in 1946 to negotiate a solution. 28 When Hodgson went on those trips he had hoped to reach an agreement with the United States that would preclude sharing with any co-channel stations closer than Los Angeles, where KFI at 50,000 watts shared the 640 Kcs frequency. But the frequency problem plagued the country until 1949. Frustrated by the job, Hodgson left The Bahamas in 1947. The ensuing battle with Cuba over the 640 Kcs frequency was resolved in 1946 when Cuba offered its 1540 Kcs assignment to The Bahamas. 29 The changes meant community radios needed to be adjusted frequently for the new frequencies, but these were considered minor inconveniences in return for interference-free broadcasting to the Out Islands. The assignment of a permanent home on the spectrum did not end the country’s frequency problems. In 1946, the country’s inadequate use of the assigned 1540 Kcs frequency was a threat to its claim to that frequency. In 1946 when The Bahamas became a signatory member of the international body, North American Regional Broadcasting Agreement (N.A.R.B.A.), which regulated the electromagnetic spectrum in its hemisphere, it was granted frequency protection under international laws. 30 However, those laws also required The Bahamas to operate on international standards—a minimum of nine hours. Thus the country faced the potential loss of its frequency at the next North American Regional Broadcasting conference in 1948. At that time ZNS operated a five-hour daily schedule on 5,000 watts; it needed to increase its operation to nine hours and its power to 50,000 watts to retain the frequency. In 1946, it was estimated that nearly £5,000 would be needed for additional equipment and personnel to expand the station’s schedule to prevent the loss of the new frequency. The government did not have the funds to improve the station’s operations. This situation led to increase discussions on the need

Authors: Storr, Juliette.
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reception in the Out Islands. However, a station in Santiago de Cuba began operating on the 640
frequency and interfered with the transmission of ZNS to the Out Islands. The frequency problem
resulted in Hodgson’s visit to Cuba and the United States in 1946 to negotiate a solution.
28
When Hodgson went on those trips he had hoped to reach an agreement with the United
States that would preclude sharing with any co-channel stations closer than Los Angeles, where
KFI at 50,000 watts shared the 640 Kcs frequency. But the frequency problem plagued the
country until 1949. Frustrated by the job, Hodgson left The Bahamas in 1947. The ensuing battle
with Cuba over the 640 Kcs frequency was resolved in 1946 when Cuba offered its 1540 Kcs
assignment to The Bahamas.
29
The changes meant community radios needed to be adjusted
frequently for the new frequencies, but these were considered minor inconveniences in return for
interference-free broadcasting to the Out Islands.
The assignment of a permanent home on the spectrum did not end the country’s
frequency problems. In 1946, the country’s inadequate use of the assigned 1540 Kcs frequency
was a threat to its claim to that frequency. In 1946 when The Bahamas became a signatory
member of the international body, North American Regional Broadcasting Agreement
(N.A.R.B.A.), which regulated the electromagnetic spectrum in its hemisphere, it was granted
frequency protection under international laws.
30
However, those laws also required The Bahamas
to operate on international standards—a minimum of nine hours. Thus the country faced the
potential loss of its frequency at the next North American Regional Broadcasting conference in
1948. At that time ZNS operated a five-hour daily schedule on 5,000 watts; it needed to increase
its operation to nine hours and its power to 50,000 watts to retain the frequency. In 1946, it was
estimated that nearly £5,000 would be needed for additional equipment and personnel to expand
the station’s schedule to prevent the loss of the new frequency. The government did not have the
funds to improve the station’s operations. This situation led to increase discussions on the need


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