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Reflections on the Past, Questions of the Future--Public Service Broadcasting: A Case Study of The Bahamas Broadcasting System,
Unformatted Document Text:  15 social and economic status for the majority of the citizens. Those changes, which are discussed in the next section, also affected broadcasting. In 1949, the move towards commercialization began with debates in the House of Assembly. From the end of 1949 until the summer of 1950, the station continued to plan for commercial operations. In July 1950, John S. Carlile, a white American broadcaster, was hired for six months to supervise and reorganize ZNS as a commercial radio station. The change became effective on August 1, 1950. 36 The station’s operating schedule also was increased to 18 hours per day. Harcourt Bethel replaced Carlile in early January 1951 but was not confirmed as station manger until mid-August of that year. Bethel, a white Abaconian, is acknowledged as the first Bahamian general manager of ZNS. With a new direction and management at the start of the 1950s, ZNS became a more profitable operation. By the end of February 1952 the station had generated more than £6,000 in advertising sales from fifty active accounts that had produced 102 contracts. 37 Although by the early 1950s the economic forecast for the station was optimistic, the station was still plagued with an old problem: interference from the wireless services. ZNS still operated out of the Telecommunications Department with the transmission equipment located at the department’s Perpall Swamp compound along with wireless transmissions. To correct the problem meant spending more money. A proposal was made by the department’s new director, Kenneth Ingraham (who replaced Hodgson in 1948), to move the radio transmitter from the swamp site to a location nearer the ocean because over-water propagation of the signal would result in a stronger field strength for the station and better reception throughout The Bahamas. 38 The requested money, £5,800, would be used to construct a new transmitter building and an l65-foot antenna, 100 feet from shore. This option was cheaper than increasing the transmitter’s power at the existing site. The new proposed improvements also involved

Authors: Storr, Juliette.
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15
social and economic status for the majority of the citizens. Those changes, which are discussed in
the next section, also affected broadcasting.
In 1949, the move towards commercialization began with debates in the House of
Assembly. From the end of 1949 until the summer of 1950, the station continued to plan for
commercial operations. In July 1950, John S. Carlile, a white American broadcaster, was hired
for six months to supervise and reorganize ZNS as a commercial radio station. The change
became effective on August 1, 1950.
36
The station’s operating schedule also was increased to 18
hours per day. Harcourt Bethel replaced Carlile in early January 1951 but was not confirmed as
station manger until mid-August of that year. Bethel, a white Abaconian, is acknowledged as the
first Bahamian general manager of ZNS.
With a new direction and management at the start of the 1950s, ZNS became a more
profitable operation. By the end of February 1952 the station had generated more than £6,000 in
advertising sales from fifty active accounts that had produced 102 contracts.
37
Although by the early 1950s the economic forecast for the station was optimistic, the
station was still plagued with an old problem: interference from the wireless services. ZNS still
operated out of the Telecommunications Department with the transmission equipment located at
the department’s Perpall Swamp compound along with wireless transmissions. To correct the
problem meant spending more money. A proposal was made by the department’s new director,
Kenneth Ingraham (who replaced Hodgson in 1948), to move the radio transmitter from the
swamp site to a location nearer the ocean because over-water propagation of the signal would
result in a stronger field strength for the station and better reception throughout The Bahamas.
38
The requested money, £5,800, would be used to construct a new transmitter building and
an l65-foot antenna, 100 feet from shore. This option was cheaper than increasing the
transmitter’s power at the existing site. The new proposed improvements also involved


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