All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Reflections on the Past, Questions of the Future--Public Service Broadcasting: A Case Study of The Bahamas Broadcasting System,
Unformatted Document Text:  20 changed the focus of broadcasting from the capital to other populated parts of the country, specifically, Freeport (Grand Bahama), the second largest city. These improvements to physical facilities and services were accompanied by increases in staff. In the 1950s the station had turned to white, foreign professionals to staff the expanded commercial operation. In the 1950s and 1960s, the hiring of foreign journalists resulted in much criticism from the public. The Telecommunications Board explained it hired foreign journalists because there were no locally trained journalists. There were no locally trained journalists because the country operated a very elite British educational system that did not trickle down to the majority of the population, at least not until the late 1960s when the PLP won the general elections. After the change in the country’s administration in the late 1960s, the new government focused on educating the majority of the population and changed the hiring practices at government and non-government institutions. These changes were also instituted at ZNS. Charles Carter, former general manager of ZNS explained the transition: The new government believed it ought to have its own people in positions of power in broadcasting and in positions of power throughout the public service… The PLP had a very defined policy of what it called “Bahamianization” which had at its apex, that’s its objective, to fit Bahamians to own, run, manage, live prosper from The Bahamas. As a result then training came along and in 1969 Calsey Johnson and I were given training at Ryerson Polytechnical in Toronto. 48 In the 1970s and beyond, ZNS implemented a new training program for its personnel. Initially, training took place in Canada and Britain. However, by the 1980s more employees were going to journalism schools in the United States. Thus ZNS changed its concept once again when it replaced foreign workers with Bahamians. As a result of the changes in personnel, other areas were also changed, especially programming. The 1970s also saw the introduction of a government-owned television station and further expansion of radio services. The third service, Radio Bahamas Northern Service ZNS-3,

Authors: Storr, Juliette.
first   previous   Page 20 of 33   next   last



background image
20
changed the focus of broadcasting from the capital to other populated parts of the country,
specifically, Freeport (Grand Bahama), the second largest city.
These improvements to physical facilities and services were accompanied by increases in
staff. In the 1950s the station had turned to white, foreign professionals to staff the expanded
commercial operation. In the 1950s and 1960s, the hiring of foreign journalists resulted in much
criticism from the public. The Telecommunications Board explained it hired foreign journalists
because there were no locally trained journalists. There were no locally trained journalists
because the country operated a very elite British educational system that did not trickle down to
the majority of the population, at least not until the late 1960s when the PLP won the general
elections. After the change in the country’s administration in the late 1960s, the new government
focused on educating the majority of the population and changed the hiring practices at
government and non-government institutions. These changes were also instituted at ZNS. Charles
Carter, former general manager of ZNS explained the transition:
The new government believed it ought to have its own people in positions of power
in broadcasting and in positions of power throughout the public service…
The PLP had a very defined policy of what it called “Bahamianization”
which had at its apex, that’s its objective, to fit Bahamians to own, run, manage, live
prosper from The Bahamas. As a result then training came along and in 1969
Calsey Johnson and I were given training at Ryerson Polytechnical in Toronto.
48
In the 1970s and beyond, ZNS implemented a new training program for its personnel. Initially,
training took place in Canada and Britain. However, by the 1980s more employees were going to
journalism schools in the United States. Thus ZNS changed its concept once again when it
replaced foreign workers with Bahamians. As a result of the changes in personnel, other areas
were also changed, especially programming.
The 1970s also saw the introduction of a government-owned television station and
further expansion of radio services. The third service, Radio Bahamas Northern Service ZNS-3,


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 20 of 33   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.