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Reflections on the Past, Questions of the Future--Public Service Broadcasting: A Case Study of The Bahamas Broadcasting System,
Unformatted Document Text:  21 was established on May 19, 1973, to accommodate the northern Bahamas, including Northern Abaco, Bimini, Andros, the Berry Islands, and Freeport, Grand Bahama. ZNS-3 started broadcasting on a frequency of 1060 khz, with a transmitting power of 1,000 watts. The station was started to coincide with the country’s independence. ZNS radio played a significant role in educating and informing the citizens of the country about the transition from a colony to an independent state. Since 1973, ZNS-3 has changed both its frequency and transmitting power. This expansion extended its listening area, and the signal is heard in New Providence, Andros, Eleuthera, Cat Island, Exuma, and in South Florida. In 1993, ZNS-3 broadcast on the frequency of 810 khz and had a transmitting power of 5,000 watts. In Freeport, local television started almost twenty years later in 1990. The Bahamas did not introduce local television until 1977. However, Bahamians had been receiving spill over television signals from Florida well before the government started local television. The discussion on local television entered the public debate in 1957. The first attempt to bring local television to the country was made when KOCO-TV in Oklahoma City tried to initiate local television service in 1967. KOCO-TV signed an agreement with the Bahamian government to provide a variety of training, management, and equipment services, but in 1968 the Bahamian government stopped its television plans because of the internal conflict between the Telecommunications Board and the Broadcasting and Television Commission. These two bodies did not agree on two key issues: location of the station and type of system-- ‘black and white’ or ‘color’. 49 Television services began in Nassau almost ten years later when the radio station extended its services with ZNS TV-13. By then the Broadcasting and Television Commission had become the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas (BCB). The new television station started test transmissions on July 4, 1977, and began official programming on July 10, 1977, Independence Day. ZNS TV-13 is seen 130 miles from Nassau. In 1993

Authors: Storr, Juliette.
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was established on May 19, 1973, to accommodate the northern Bahamas, including Northern
Abaco, Bimini, Andros, the Berry Islands, and Freeport, Grand Bahama. ZNS-3 started
broadcasting on a frequency of 1060 khz, with a transmitting power of 1,000 watts. The station
was started to coincide with the country’s independence. ZNS radio played a significant role in
educating and informing the citizens of the country about the transition from a colony to an
independent state. Since 1973, ZNS-3 has changed both its frequency and transmitting power.
This expansion extended its listening area, and the signal is heard in New Providence, Andros,
Eleuthera, Cat Island, Exuma, and in South Florida. In 1993, ZNS-3 broadcast on the frequency
of 810 khz and had a transmitting power of 5,000 watts. In Freeport, local television started
almost twenty years later in 1990.
The Bahamas did not introduce local television until 1977. However, Bahamians had
been receiving spill over television signals from Florida well before the government started local
television. The discussion on local television entered the public debate in 1957. The first attempt
to bring local television to the country was made when KOCO-TV in Oklahoma City tried to
initiate local television service in 1967. KOCO-TV signed an agreement with the Bahamian
government to provide a variety of training, management, and equipment services, but in 1968
the Bahamian government stopped its television plans because of the internal conflict between
the Telecommunications Board and the Broadcasting and Television Commission. These two
bodies did not agree on two key issues: location of the station and type of system-- ‘black and
white’ or ‘color’.
49
Television services began in Nassau almost ten years later when the radio
station extended its services with ZNS TV-13. By then the Broadcasting and Television
Commission had become the Broadcasting Corporation of the Bahamas (BCB). The new
television station started test transmissions on July 4, 1977, and began official programming on
July 10, 1977, Independence Day. ZNS TV-13 is seen 130 miles from Nassau. In 1993


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