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Reflections on the Past, Questions of the Future--Public Service Broadcasting: A Case Study of The Bahamas Broadcasting System,
Unformatted Document Text:  28 with the same message. Bahamian listeners, and later viewers, became more interested as the quantity and quality of programs increased after 1950. Music programs became more entertaining; radio personalities became more endearing; and news programs were more informative and interesting. Government agencies and departments began to use radio and television to disseminate information to the public, particularly on education and public health. Radio broadcasting (and later television) cut across physical, economic and social barriers, to provide a variety of common cultural experiences. Numerous internal and external forces identified in this study facilitated changes in the development of broadcasting. Particularly, British colonization gave broadcasting its structure and function. American technology and programming changed its format and content. Canadian training and programming also influenced its format and content. Caribbean and Commonwealth cooperatives gave it a more regional focus. Bahamianization brought social, economic, political, and cultural changes to the Bahamian society and an indigenous focus to broadcasting. The broadcasting industry served as an informational network connecting the many elements of the Bahamian society. It grew from a small operation that concentrated on fulfilling the communication needs of the rural population in the 1930s and 1940s to a network of four government radio stations and one television station in 1993 that focused on national development and national identity. This marked the start of a new paradigm as the country changed its emphasis from contributing to the construction of the British Empire to building the Bahamian nation. Another paradigm shift occurred with the start of private radio in 1993. Here the government changed the system/structure from a monopoly to a duopoly. From weather reports and shipping announcements, to church services and personal requests, musical shows and local programs ZNS mediates all aspects of the Bahamian social world. By 1973, ZNS had become the “Voice of The Bahamas.” It provided a means for this

Authors: Storr, Juliette.
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with the same message. Bahamian listeners, and later viewers, became more interested as the
quantity and quality of programs increased after 1950. Music programs became more
entertaining; radio personalities became more endearing; and news programs were more
informative and interesting. Government agencies and departments began to use radio and
television to disseminate information to the public, particularly on education and public health.
Radio broadcasting (and later television) cut across physical, economic and social barriers, to
provide a variety of common cultural experiences.
Numerous internal and external forces identified in this study facilitated changes in the
development of broadcasting. Particularly, British colonization gave broadcasting its structure
and function. American technology and programming changed its format and content. Canadian
training and programming also influenced its format and content. Caribbean and Commonwealth
cooperatives gave it a more regional focus. Bahamianization brought social, economic, political,
and cultural changes to the Bahamian society and an indigenous focus to broadcasting.
The broadcasting industry served as an informational network connecting the many
elements of the Bahamian society. It grew from a small operation that concentrated on fulfilling
the communication needs of the rural population in the 1930s and 1940s to a network of four
government radio stations and one television station in 1993 that focused on national
development and national identity. This marked the start of a new paradigm as the country
changed its emphasis from contributing to the construction of the British Empire to building the
Bahamian nation. Another paradigm shift occurred with the start of private radio in 1993. Here
the government changed the system/structure from a monopoly to a duopoly.
From weather reports and shipping announcements, to church services and personal
requests, musical shows and local programs ZNS mediates all aspects of the Bahamian social
world. By 1973, ZNS had become the “Voice of The Bahamas.” It provided a means for this


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