All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Historical Drifts Without Paradigm Shifts: A Historical Analysis of Newspaper Coverage of Social Protest
Unformatted Document Text:  Protest Coverage in Wisconsin Newspapers 1960-1999 -14- using these two new variables to trace significant trends and differences over time in the types of protests and issues covered by the urban and rural Wisconsin newspapers. The five newspapers used for the analysis were recoded into a bivariate variable based upon whether they were urban (Madison and Milwaukee) or rural (Watertown, Sauk Prairie, and Park Falls). The original 15+ protest locations recorded in the original content analysis were recoded into three categories: “Madison,” “Milwaukee,” and “other locations.” While the content analysis yielded a large number of protest targets, these targets fell into seven categories: (1) social entities (2) police (3) military (4) labor (5) schools (and universities) (6) government, and (7) landlords. Prominence was measured with two variables: the newspaper section that carried the article, and the number of paragraphs in an article. Number of paragraphs was recoded into a 3- item ‘low’ (1-15 paragraphs), ‘medium’ (16-30 paragraphs), ‘high’ (31 or more paragraphs) scale. Results What patterns of protest activities and social movements emerge over these four decades in Wisconsin as reflected by their coverage in Wisconsin newspapers? Overall, the crosstabulation tables revealed that a significant percentage (63.0%) of the protests recorded in Wisconsin newspapers occurred in the 1960s. While there was a drastic decrease in the percentage of protests (covered) in Wisconsin in the 1970s (to 10.2%), a gradually increasing trend is noticed in each of the subsequent decades. The 1980s accounted for 11.3% of the protests and the 1990s accounted for 15.5% (X 2 =126.139, df = 15, p= .000).

Authors: Devanathan, Narayan., Boyle, Michael., Shevy, Mark., McCluskey, Michael., Stein, Susan., Hillback, Elliott. and McLeod, Douglas.
first   previous   Page 14 of 35   next   last



background image
Protest Coverage in Wisconsin Newspapers 1960-1999 -14-
using these two new variables to trace significant trends and differences over time in the types of
protests and issues covered by the urban and rural Wisconsin newspapers.
The five newspapers used for the analysis were recoded into a bivariate variable based
upon whether they were urban (Madison and Milwaukee) or rural (Watertown, Sauk Prairie, and
Park Falls).
The original 15+ protest locations recorded in the original content analysis were recoded
into three categories: “Madison,” “Milwaukee,” and “other locations.”
While the content analysis yielded a large number of protest targets, these targets fell into
seven categories: (1) social entities (2) police (3) military (4) labor (5) schools (and universities)
(6) government, and (7) landlords.
Prominence was measured with two variables: the newspaper section that carried the
article, and the number of paragraphs in an article. Number of paragraphs was recoded into a 3-
item ‘low’ (1-15 paragraphs), ‘medium’ (16-30 paragraphs), ‘high’ (31 or more paragraphs)
scale.
Results
What patterns of protest activities and social movements emerge over these four decades
in Wisconsin as reflected by their coverage in Wisconsin newspapers?
Overall, the crosstabulation tables revealed that a significant percentage (63.0%) of the
protests recorded in Wisconsin newspapers occurred in the 1960s. While there was a drastic
decrease in the percentage of protests (covered) in Wisconsin in the 1970s (to 10.2%), a
gradually increasing trend is noticed in each of the subsequent decades. The 1980s accounted for
11.3% of the protests and the 1990s accounted for 15.5% (X
2
=126.139, df = 15, p= .000).


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 14 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.