All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Historical Drifts Without Paradigm Shifts: A Historical Analysis of Newspaper Coverage of Social Protest
Unformatted Document Text:  Protest Coverage in Wisconsin Newspapers 1960-1999 -4- likelihood of coverage is the size of the “news hole” for protest events relative to the contextual effects of other prevalent and newsworthy items (Oliver & Myers, 2000). Media are also crucial for protest researchers because they represent an easily accessible, continuous and relatively reliable source of information on different public events, including protests. This does not mean, however, that we should assume newspaper coverage to be accurate and complete, nor that newspapers present a representative sample of the universe of protests that occur. To the contrary, scholars such as Gans (1980), Herman and Chomsky (1988), and Shoemaker and Reese (1991) have argued that the media are neither passive channels of communication nor are they neutral and objective observers and recorders of events. Particularly, groups that challenge the social system often encounter news coverage that is hostile to their interests (McLeod & Hertog, 1999). Facing an uphill battle, recent protest groups have expended more energy and resources to generate positive responses from the mass media regarding their “cause.” As Oliver and Myers (1999) note, activists, police and media become members of an improvised troupe with not, perhaps, a fixed script, but a general framework of how events will unfold. Newspaper coverage has typically been studied as a monolithic phenomenon, in which the behavior of elite media came to represent behavior of media in general. While different types of newspapers all contribute information, interpretation and entertainment to their readers, each seeks to address the specific needs of their readers and the communities. Thus, each newspaper’s news values have to reflect the needs and values of the community the paper serves. This is both an economic and professional goal. Economics are at play in attracting and keeping readers and advertisers. Professional goals may drive concerns about the social responsibility of that publication to serve the community and its needs. Research has also indicated that media in

Authors: Devanathan, Narayan., Boyle, Michael., Shevy, Mark., McCluskey, Michael., Stein, Susan., Hillback, Elliott. and McLeod, Douglas.
first   previous   Page 4 of 35   next   last



background image
Protest Coverage in Wisconsin Newspapers 1960-1999 -4-
likelihood of coverage is the size of the “news hole” for protest events relative to the contextual
effects of other prevalent and newsworthy items (Oliver & Myers, 2000).
Media are also crucial for protest researchers because they represent an easily accessible,
continuous and relatively reliable source of information on different public events, including
protests. This does not mean, however, that we should assume newspaper coverage to be accurate
and complete, nor that newspapers present a representative sample of the universe of protests that
occur. To the contrary, scholars such as Gans (1980), Herman and Chomsky (1988), and
Shoemaker and Reese (1991) have argued that the media are neither passive channels of
communication nor are they neutral and objective observers and recorders of events.
Particularly, groups that challenge the social system often encounter news coverage that is
hostile to their interests (McLeod & Hertog, 1999). Facing an uphill battle, recent protest groups
have expended more energy and resources to generate positive responses from the mass media
regarding their “cause.” As Oliver and Myers (1999) note, activists, police and media become
members of an improvised troupe with not, perhaps, a fixed script, but a general framework of
how events will unfold.
Newspaper coverage has typically been studied as a monolithic phenomenon, in which
the behavior of elite media came to represent behavior of media in general. While different types
of newspapers all contribute information, interpretation and entertainment to their readers, each
seeks to address the specific needs of their readers and the communities. Thus, each newspaper’s
news values have to reflect the needs and values of the community the paper serves. This is both
an economic and professional goal. Economics are at play in attracting and keeping readers and
advertisers. Professional goals may drive concerns about the social responsibility of that
publication to serve the community and its needs. Research has also indicated that media in


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.