All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Relationship Equals Sum Media Use: Examining Relationships as Media Ecologies
Unformatted Document Text:  Relationship Equals Sum Media Use 3 Figure 1: Shannon’s (1949) Model of the Communication Process. The primary value associated with the Shannon model these days is pedagogical. We continue to use it (often calling it an action model) and others (generally the interactive and transactive models, and occasionally a two step flow or gatekeeper model) in the early chapters of introductory communication textbooks (for example, Adler, 1991; Adler, Rosenfeld, and Towne, 1996; Barker and Barker, 1993; Becker and Roberts, 1992; Beebe, Beebe, and Redmond, 2001; Berko, Wolvin, and Wolvin, 1985; Bittner, 1996; Burgoon, Hunsaker, and Dawson, 1994; DeFleur, Kearney, and Temothy, 1993; DeVito, 1994; Gamble and Gamble, 1986; Gibson and Hanna, 1992; Taylor, Rosegrant, Meyer, and Samples, 1986; Wood, 2002). Our theory and research traditions have generally moved forward from such "linear" conceptions of the communication process. There may, however, still be theoretical value in exploring and improving our communication models. A model offered by Foulger (2002), for instance, offers a useful summary view of our communication structures, systems, and processes that elaborates earlier models while avoiding linear data flows and suggesting an additional entry point for research on relationships. A variation of this model is shown in Figure 2. In the model of Figure 2, individuals (represented as both creators and consumers who form relationships with each other) communicate via a mutual orientation to messages that are constructed with language and enabled by media. Several attributes of this model are interesting in the context of relational communication. First, messages are not something to flow through the aether. They are imagined, created, observed, and decoded by people who attend to them. Messages in this model do not passively arrive. They are actively consumed by people who learn and interpret the messages they receive, the languages in which messages are encoded and the media in which those messages are enacted and observed. This model is somewhat more explicit than the classic model of our introductory communication texts in identifying the principle starting points associated with current relationship research. Individuals are represented in this model as creators and consumers of messages, discourse as messages encoded within flexibly interchangeable roles, language and relationships are identified directly, and all operate within a system.

Authors: Foulger, Davis.
first   previous   Page 3 of 15   next   last



background image
Relationship Equals Sum Media Use
3
Figure 1: Shannon’s (1949) Model of the Communication Process.
The primary value associated with the Shannon model these days is pedagogical. We
continue to use it (often calling it an action model) and others (generally the interactive
and transactive models, and occasionally a two step flow or gatekeeper model) in the
early chapters of introductory communication textbooks (for example, Adler, 1991;
Adler, Rosenfeld, and Towne, 1996; Barker and Barker, 1993; Becker and Roberts, 1992;
Beebe, Beebe, and Redmond, 2001; Berko, Wolvin, and Wolvin, 1985; Bittner, 1996;
Burgoon, Hunsaker, and Dawson, 1994; DeFleur, Kearney, and Temothy, 1993; DeVito,
1994; Gamble and Gamble, 1986; Gibson and Hanna, 1992; Taylor, Rosegrant, Meyer,
and Samples, 1986; Wood, 2002). Our theory and research traditions have generally
moved forward from such "linear" conceptions of the communication process. There
may, however, still be theoretical value in exploring and improving our communication
models. A model offered by Foulger (2002), for instance, offers a useful summary view
of our communication structures, systems, and processes that elaborates earlier models
while avoiding linear data flows and suggesting an additional entry point for research on
relationships. A variation of this model is shown in Figure 2.
In the model of Figure 2, individuals (represented as both creators and consumers who
form relationships with each other) communicate via a mutual orientation to messages
that are constructed with language and enabled by media. Several attributes of this model
are interesting in the context of relational communication. First, messages are not
something to flow through the aether. They are imagined, created, observed, and decoded
by people who attend to them. Messages in this model do not passively arrive. They are
actively consumed by people who learn and interpret the messages they receive, the
languages in which messages are encoded and the media in which those messages are
enacted and observed. This model is somewhat more explicit than the classic model of
our introductory communication texts in identifying the principle starting points
associated with current relationship research. Individuals are represented in this model as
creators and consumers of messages, discourse as messages encoded within flexibly
interchangeable roles, language and relationships are identified directly, and all operate
within a system.


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 15   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.