All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Relationship Equals Sum Media Use: Examining Relationships as Media Ecologies
Unformatted Document Text:  Relationship Equals Sum Media Use 5 Collecting media as our relationships evolve Every relationship starts with an initial interaction. That interaction could be as minimal as a shared glance across a crowded room that isn’t expanded on for weeks or months ("Haven’t I seen you before?" is a common enough line in a first conversation, and often a statement of shared remembrance). In general, however, we wouldn’t consider that a true relationship exists unless and until there is some level of ongoing interaction. Relationships are enacted over time in a large number of interactions, and that the resulting relationship is a product of an emergent text of feelings, remembrance, relational rules, and relationship practice. The presumption, in much of the existing relationship literature, is that this interaction is prototypically face-to-face. None of the collected essays in Conville and Rogers’ (1998) The Meaning of "Relationship" in Interpersonal Communication discusses any variant of interaction but face-to-face interaction, even when (as is the case in Rawlins essay) the participants in a sample dialog make specific mention of the use of letters, telephones, and postcards. This prototypic treatment may be reasonable if one remains focused on the participants in relationships and the characteristics of relationships. It becomes strained if one assumes that the messages and language of face-to-face interaction will be invariant in other media. This is important, as this presumption ignores a substantial reality of relationships that has been made particularly obvious by Internet users: many strong and enduring relationships rarely if ever entail face-to-face communication. If, as McLuhan (1964) observed, the medium is the message (or that there is, at the very least, a message associated with the medium), it seems likely that relationships that entail little or no face-to-face interaction will have a character that differs, in at least some regards, from those paradigmatically correct relationships that use only face-to-face interaction. Indeed, on today’s Internet, it is hardly uncommon for relationships to unfold across a series of media following a pattern that closely resembles the following: • An individual "meets" someone who seems interesting in the course of participating in an online chatroom, a computer conference, a mailing list, acollaborative composition site, a bulletin board, a multiplayer computer game, role-based interaction space, or some other interactive online environment. Initial interaction within these interactive environments is probably highly role-limited (following Rawlins’, 1992 stages of friendship). When interactants are interested in moving beyond role-limitations and the relevant on-line medium supports it, the move to friendly relations will probably proceed within that medium. • A move towards friendship is made. While the invitation may well occur in a public on-line venue like those above, enactment of the process of getting better acquainted generally moves to a more private on-line venue. Most commonly this will be e-mail, but other possibilities include private chat rooms and instant messaging. Indeed, it will not be uncommon, as interaction intensifies, to use two or more of these options.

Authors: Foulger, Davis.
first   previous   Page 5 of 15   next   last



background image
Relationship Equals Sum Media Use
5
Collecting media as our relationships evolve
Every relationship starts with an initial interaction. That interaction could be as minimal
as a shared glance across a crowded room that isn’t expanded on for weeks or months
("Haven’t I seen you before?" is a common enough line in a first conversation, and often
a statement of shared remembrance). In general, however, we wouldn’t consider that a
true relationship exists unless and until there is some level of ongoing interaction.
Relationships are enacted over time in a large number of interactions, and that the
resulting relationship is a product of an emergent text of feelings, remembrance,
relational rules, and relationship practice.
The presumption, in much of the existing relationship literature, is that this interaction is
prototypically face-to-face. None of the collected essays in Conville and Rogers’ (1998)
The Meaning of "Relationship" in Interpersonal Communication discusses any variant of
interaction but face-to-face interaction, even when (as is the case in Rawlins essay) the
participants in a sample dialog make specific mention of the use of letters, telephones,
and postcards. This prototypic treatment may be reasonable if one remains focused on the
participants in relationships and the characteristics of relationships. It becomes strained if
one assumes that the messages and language of face-to-face interaction will be invariant
in other media. This is important, as this presumption ignores a substantial reality of
relationships that has been made particularly obvious by Internet users: many strong and
enduring relationships rarely if ever entail face-to-face communication.
If, as McLuhan (1964) observed, the medium is the message (or that there is, at the very
least, a message associated with the medium), it seems likely that relationships that entail
little or no face-to-face interaction will have a character that differs, in at least some
regards, from those paradigmatically correct relationships that use only face-to-face
interaction. Indeed, on today’s Internet, it is hardly uncommon for relationships to unfold
across a series of media following a pattern that closely resembles the following:
An individual "meets" someone who seems interesting in the course of
participating in an online chatroom, a computer conference, a mailing list, a
collaborative composition site, a bulletin board, a multiplayer computer
game
, role-based interaction space, or some other interactive online
environment. Initial interaction within these interactive environments is probably
highly role-limited (following Rawlins’, 1992 stages of friendship). When
interactants are interested in moving beyond role-limitations and the relevant on-
line medium supports it, the move to friendly relations will probably proceed
within that medium.
A move towards friendship is made. While the invitation may well occur in a
public on-line venue like those above, enactment of the process of getting better
acquainted generally moves to a more private on-line venue. Most commonly this
will be e-mail, but other possibilities include private chat rooms and instant
messaging.
Indeed, it will not be uncommon, as interaction intensifies, to use two
or more of these options.


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 5 of 15   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.