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Advice to Practitioners: A Review of the Popular Press Literature on Planned Change Communication
Unformatted Document Text:  Advice to Practitioners - 10 However, they explicitly state that these two things should not be seen as problems, but rather as natural responses to changes in the level of openness that is occurring during the change initiative. Whereas several authors present this philosophy without any judgment, most assume that this is more of an “inevitable obstacle…. always occurring” (Belasco, 1991, p. 31). This is typically framed negatively as Brandt (1996) elaborates, “process are easy, people are tough—it’s been my experience that people naturally resist change.” (p.6). Furthermore, it is presented as a critical part of change. The first sentence in Maurer’s (1996) book is “resistance kills change” (p. 1-check). He further explains that “progress without resistance is impossible” (p. 24). Variety of Reactions to change. Duck (2001) provides a nice context for this theme contained in four books. “Expect the rule of thirds—1/3 will see the changes as irrelevant to them, 1/3 will embrace them with varying degrees of enthusiasm, and 1/3 will disagree and resist either openly or in secret” (p. 153). Brandt (1996) suggests that instead of taking the “fire them” approach advocated by some authors, a transformational leadership approach to change should be adopted. People’s response to change varies and so must the leader’s approach in preparing them for change—resistance is a personal issue. In another example, Heller (1998) explains that resistance is only one of three ways to react to change. The other two are following and leading. Resistance is rational and desirable. A different approach to change, represented in a smaller subsample of the books, suggests that resistance should be viewed by implementers as a form of checks and balances in the change process. Dupuy (2002) argues that change is complex and there are times when it is correct to resist change. Heller (1998) also explains that “objectors may have a genuine cause for concern- resistance is not necessarily misguided or unreasonable” (p. 53). Mauer (1996), one of the strongest advocates for this approach, argues that resistance provides a kind of protection for the organization and that it also provides energy to the change effort. Mauer advises implementers to attempt to redirect the energy of resistance into a more positive form of participation. Mauer suggests taking

Authors: Lewis, Laurie., Stephens, Keri., Schmisseur, Amy. and Weir, Kathleen.
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Advice to Practitioners - 10
However, they explicitly state that these two things should not be seen as problems, but rather as natural
responses to changes in the level of openness that is occurring during the change initiative.
Whereas several authors present this philosophy without any judgment, most assume that this is
more of an “inevitable obstacle…. always occurring” (Belasco, 1991, p. 31). This is typically framed
negatively as Brandt (1996) elaborates, “process are easy, people are tough—it’s been my experience that
people naturally resist change.” (p.6). Furthermore, it is presented as a critical part of change. The first
sentence in Maurer’s (1996) book is “resistance kills change” (p. 1-check). He further explains that
“progress without resistance is impossible” (p. 24).
Variety of Reactions to change. Duck (2001) provides a nice context for this theme contained in
four books. “Expect the rule of thirds—1/3 will see the changes as irrelevant to them, 1/3 will embrace
them with varying degrees of enthusiasm, and 1/3 will disagree and resist either openly or in secret” (p.
153). Brandt (1996) suggests that instead of taking the “fire them” approach advocated by some authors,
a transformational leadership approach to change should be adopted. People’s response to change varies
and so must the leader’s approach in preparing them for change—resistance is a personal issue. In
another example, Heller (1998) explains that resistance is only one of three ways to react to change. The
other two are following and leading.
Resistance is rational and desirable. A different approach to change, represented in a smaller
subsample of the books, suggests that resistance should be viewed by implementers as a form of checks
and balances in the change process. Dupuy (2002) argues that change is complex and there are times
when it is correct to resist change. Heller (1998) also explains that “objectors may have a genuine cause
for concern- resistance is not necessarily misguided or unreasonable” (p. 53). Mauer (1996), one of the
strongest advocates for this approach, argues that resistance provides a kind of protection for the
organization and that it also provides energy to the change effort. Mauer advises implementers to attempt
to redirect the energy of resistance into a more positive form of participation. Mauer suggests taking


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