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Advice to Practitioners: A Review of the Popular Press Literature on Planned Change Communication
Unformatted Document Text:  Advice to Practitioners - 14 change), and a facilitative style (i.e., a process by which leaders neither plan entirely nor do they let the process completely unfold on its own). Autonomy/Empowerment In many of these books there also exists a strong argument for change agents to empower and encourage their associates to take ownership and to be independent thinkers, particularly when it comes to evaluating and implementing various change processes. Although change is often viewed as a controlled process, leaders are encouraged to relinquish some of that control for the sake of creating autonomous work groups. Thus, the tension of control versus autonomy that captures the essence of so many organizational practices is notably evident during change implementation. Pritchett and Pound (1994), for instance, suggest that managers encourage risk-taking and initiative-seeking behaviors by empowering members to be independent thinkers and action-oriented during change. Moreover, Brandt (1996) argues that if people are going to be motivated to change, then creating a sense of ownership among them is critical. To further establish ownership, organizations must relinquish control to members by giving them a broad outline from which to work and providing them with the resources necessary for achieving the change objectives (Hesslebeing & Johnston, 2002). Participation and Inclusion Participation in the change process is yet another general strategy that is heavily emphasized within the change literature. To help people more readily accept and embrace change, they need to feel a part of it. Participation gives members a sense of control and reduced uncertainty about their changing circumstances, such that if people can feel a part of the implementation process, they will be more committed to the change and, thus, less resistant to its goals and objectives. As such, a substantial proportion of these authors suggest that all potential stakeholders be included in the change process. For example, Maurer (1996) asserts that all stakeholders need to be utilized in creating change strategies and working through any tensions that may surface. Similarly, Holman and Devane (1999) argue that including others in the change process builds commitment and a capacity for managing turbulence within

Authors: Lewis, Laurie., Stephens, Keri., Schmisseur, Amy. and Weir, Kathleen.
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Advice to Practitioners - 14
change), and a facilitative style (i.e., a process by which leaders neither plan entirely nor do they let the
process completely unfold on its own).
Autonomy/Empowerment
In many of these books there also exists a strong argument for change agents to empower and
encourage their associates to take ownership and to be independent thinkers, particularly when it comes to
evaluating and implementing various change processes. Although change is often viewed as a controlled
process, leaders are encouraged to relinquish some of that control for the sake of creating autonomous
work groups. Thus, the tension of control versus autonomy that captures the essence of so many
organizational practices is notably evident during change implementation. Pritchett and Pound (1994), for
instance, suggest that managers encourage risk-taking and initiative-seeking behaviors by empowering
members to be independent thinkers and action-oriented during change. Moreover, Brandt (1996) argues
that if people are going to be motivated to change, then creating a sense of ownership among them is
critical. To further establish ownership, organizations must relinquish control to members by giving them
a broad outline from which to work and providing them with the resources necessary for achieving the
change objectives (Hesslebeing & Johnston, 2002).
Participation and Inclusion
Participation in the change process is yet another general strategy that is heavily emphasized
within the change literature. To help people more readily accept and embrace change, they need to feel a
part of it. Participation gives members a sense of control and reduced uncertainty about their changing
circumstances, such that if people can feel a part of the implementation process, they will be more
committed to the change and, thus, less resistant to its goals and objectives. As such, a substantial
proportion of these authors suggest that all potential stakeholders be included in the change process. For
example, Maurer (1996) asserts that all stakeholders need to be utilized in creating change strategies and
working through any tensions that may surface. Similarly, Holman and Devane (1999) argue that
including others in the change process builds commitment and a capacity for managing turbulence within


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