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Advice to Practitioners: A Review of the Popular Press Literature on Planned Change Communication
Unformatted Document Text:  Advice to Practitioners - 15 the change effort. Goss, Pascale, and Athos (1998) argue that “harnessing contention” through participation is a good way to obey the law of requisite variety. Rationalization for Change To garner support and commitment for change, leaders are encouraged to provide a consistent and strong justification for the change. According to Heller (1998), publicizing reasons for change are necessary. Establishing a clear vision, for example, not only lends a sense of credibility and urgency to the change effort, but it can also help mitigate some of the uncertainty that often accompanies change. To help people let go of the past and move forward with the change, managers are instructed to reiterate the plan, purpose and “big picture” of the change movement (Hesslebeing & Johnston, 2002). If people know where the organization is headed and the purpose for their actions, then they are more likely to “stay the course” in seeing the change through to its fruition, despite any challenges such change presents. Leaders are further encouraged to empower others in creating a vision and justification for the change (Belasco, 1991). Rate of Change Interestingly, one point of contention within the literature involves the rate with which change should be implemented. Some of the literature suggests that moving through the change cycle too quickly increases the likelihood for resistance among members. Maurer (1996) claims “the harder management pushes to implement quickly, the further everyone digs in” (p. 84). Similarly, Larkin and Larkin (1994) argue that it is the speed with which you gain performance improvement, and not the speed of the change itself, that matters most. On the other end of the spectrum is the belief that speed is critical to successful implementation. For example, Mourier and Smith (2001) believe that the more quickly goals and objectives are met, the greater the chance for success. Likewise, although Davidson argues ( 2002) the importance of easing into change, he also advocates the need to work through procrastination by getting into certain aspects of the change almost immediately.

Authors: Lewis, Laurie., Stephens, Keri., Schmisseur, Amy. and Weir, Kathleen.
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Advice to Practitioners - 15
the change effort. Goss, Pascale, and Athos (1998) argue that “harnessing contention” through
participation is a good way to obey the law of requisite variety.
Rationalization for Change
To garner support and commitment for change, leaders are encouraged to provide a consistent and
strong justification for the change. According to Heller (1998), publicizing reasons for change are
necessary. Establishing a clear vision, for example, not only lends a sense of credibility and urgency to the
change effort, but it can also help mitigate some of the uncertainty that often accompanies change. To
help people let go of the past and move forward with the change, managers are instructed to reiterate the
plan, purpose and “big picture” of the change movement (Hesslebeing & Johnston, 2002). If people know
where the organization is headed and the purpose for their actions, then they are more likely to “stay the
course” in seeing the change through to its fruition, despite any challenges such change presents. Leaders
are further encouraged to empower others in creating a vision and justification for the change (Belasco,
1991).
Rate of Change
Interestingly, one point of contention within the literature involves the rate with which change
should be implemented. Some of the literature suggests that moving through the change cycle too quickly
increases the likelihood for resistance among members. Maurer (1996) claims “the harder management
pushes to implement quickly, the further everyone digs in” (p. 84). Similarly, Larkin and Larkin (1994)
argue that it is the speed with which you gain performance improvement, and not the speed of the change
itself, that matters most. On the other end of the spectrum is the belief that speed is critical to successful
implementation. For example, Mourier and Smith (2001) believe that the more quickly goals and
objectives are met, the greater the chance for success. Likewise, although Davidson argues ( 2002) the
importance of easing into change, he also advocates the need to work through procrastination by getting
into certain aspects of the change almost immediately.


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