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Advice to Practitioners: A Review of the Popular Press Literature on Planned Change Communication
Unformatted Document Text:  Advice to Practitioners - 18 implementation. Specifically, we have identified seven major themes (Table 6 summarizes these basic themes). Asking for Input Eleven of the books we reviewed make explicit reference to tactics and actions that should be executed to create channels for input and/or increase participation and interaction of stakeholders of change programs. Many of these authors recommended using communication to create some sense of shared vision (Ackerman Anderson & Anderson, 2001; Cameron & Quinn, 1999; Holman & Devane (Eds.), 1999; Mauer, 1996; & Watkins & Mohr, 2001). Other authors recommend participation tactics as a means to quiet rumor mills, permit venting, create “therapy sessions” in which employees may express themselves as part of a healing process, and create “the feeling [among employees] that they have more choices and more influence” in order to make them feel better about the decisions that are being made (Prichett & Pound, 1994). Specific tactics for gathering input were provided in many of these books. The Change Handbook (1999) details several Large Group Interaction Methods (LGIMs) presented by different authors. They explain and provide some theoretical and practical rationale for each technique. Examples include Appreciative Inquiry, Open Space Technology, Dialogue, and Search Conferences. Some of these techniques are recommended by other authors as well. Some books recommended the creation and use of more customized channels for collecting input such as: formal and informal surveys and focus groups (Watkins & Mohr, 2001), holding “therapy session meetings” (Pritchett & Pound, 1994); and use of ambassadors, advisory councils, and newsletters with response forms (Mauer, 1996). A few authors claimed that face to face communication was the most effective (Davidson, 2002; Heller, 1998; Larkin & Larkin, 1994) Some books in our sample focused on guidelines and rules for good participative communication such as: make it easy for others to speak (Watkins & Mohr, 2001); be good listeners (Heller, 1998;Oakley & Krug, 1991; Pritchett & Pound, 1994); ask lots of questions (Collins; 2001; Oakley &

Authors: Lewis, Laurie., Stephens, Keri., Schmisseur, Amy. and Weir, Kathleen.
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Advice to Practitioners - 18
implementation. Specifically, we have identified seven major themes (Table 6 summarizes these basic
themes).
Asking for Input
Eleven of the books we reviewed make explicit reference to tactics and actions that should be
executed to create channels for input and/or increase participation and interaction of stakeholders of
change programs. Many of these authors recommended using communication to create some sense of
shared vision (Ackerman Anderson & Anderson, 2001; Cameron & Quinn, 1999; Holman & Devane
(Eds.), 1999; Mauer, 1996; & Watkins & Mohr, 2001). Other authors recommend participation tactics as
a means to quiet rumor mills, permit venting, create “therapy sessions” in which employees may express
themselves as part of a healing process, and create “the feeling [among employees] that they have more
choices and more influence” in order to make them feel better about the decisions that are being made
(Prichett & Pound, 1994).
Specific tactics for gathering input were provided in many of these books. The Change Handbook
(1999) details several Large Group Interaction Methods (LGIMs) presented by different authors. They
explain and provide some theoretical and practical rationale for each technique. Examples include
Appreciative Inquiry, Open Space Technology, Dialogue, and Search Conferences. Some of these
techniques are recommended by other authors as well. Some books recommended the creation and use of
more customized channels for collecting input such as: formal and informal surveys and focus groups
(Watkins & Mohr, 2001), holding “therapy session meetings” (Pritchett & Pound, 1994); and use of
ambassadors, advisory councils, and newsletters with response forms (Mauer, 1996). A few authors
claimed that face to face communication was the most effective (Davidson, 2002; Heller, 1998; Larkin &
Larkin, 1994)
Some books in our sample focused on guidelines and rules for good participative communication
such as: make it easy for others to speak (Watkins & Mohr, 2001); be good listeners (Heller,
1998;Oakley & Krug, 1991; Pritchett & Pound, 1994); ask lots of questions (Collins; 2001; Oakley &


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