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Advice to Practitioners: A Review of the Popular Press Literature on Planned Change Communication
Unformatted Document Text:  Advice to Practitioners - 21 of the strategy. Conger (2002) argues for “framing” the change by incorporating the stakeholders ideas and perspectives into your own position. Other authors focused on the use of language in change communication. In addition to discouraging the use of “jargon” and encouraging the use of “clear communication,” authors recommend the use of metaphor and story (Bridges, 1991; Conger, 2002; Meyerson, 2001) for various purposes during change. One book (Kegan & Lahey, 2001) is completely devoted to the exploration the language habits of an organization and learning to move from old styles to new ones (e.g., language of complaint to commitment, 2) language of blame to personal responsibility). Create and Communicate Vision Numerous authors in this set describe issues related to creating and communicating vision. Usually, vision creation is described as a participatory process (cf. Ackermann & Anderson, 2001; Kotter, 1996, 1998; Belasco, 1991). The authors representing this theme also give advice about mechanisms for creation of vision such as LGIMs (Holman & Devane, 1999), use of stories , meetings, asking questions, newsletters, posters, and one-on-one discussions. Much advice is provided about good qualities of visions (clear, unambiguous, “blurry,” personally relevant, simple, vivid) but not much detail is given about how the vision should be disseminated. The most prevalent advice appears to assume that if many are involved in the creation of vision, many will understand and internalize it. Be Motivational in Communication A few authors touch on the issue of motivational communication. Implied definitions of “motivation” varied from images of “cheerleading” and building “espirit de corps” (Prichett & Pound, 1994) to the metaphor of kicking people in the pants (Miller, 2002) to redesigning organizational rewards to support needed behavioral changes (Ackerman Anderson & Anderson, 2001). Those who favored motivational communication included tactics such as encouraging risk taking (Pritchett & Pound, 1994), paying compliments, writing short notes to employees, singling people out for praise (Pritchett & Pound, 1994; Heller, 1998). Collins (2001) argues that “spending time trying to motivate people is a waste of

Authors: Lewis, Laurie., Stephens, Keri., Schmisseur, Amy. and Weir, Kathleen.
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Advice to Practitioners - 21
of the strategy. Conger (2002) argues for “framing” the change by incorporating the stakeholders ideas
and perspectives into your own position.
Other authors focused on the use of language in change communication. In addition to
discouraging the use of “jargon” and encouraging the use of “clear communication,” authors recommend
the use of metaphor and story (Bridges, 1991; Conger, 2002; Meyerson, 2001) for various purposes
during change. One book (Kegan & Lahey, 2001) is completely devoted to the exploration the language
habits of an organization and learning to move from old styles to new ones (e.g., language of complaint to
commitment, 2) language of blame to personal responsibility).
Create and Communicate Vision
Numerous authors in this set describe issues related to creating and communicating vision.
Usually, vision creation is described as a participatory process (cf. Ackermann & Anderson, 2001; Kotter,
1996, 1998; Belasco, 1991). The authors representing this theme also give advice about mechanisms for
creation of vision such as LGIMs (Holman & Devane, 1999), use of stories , meetings, asking questions,
newsletters, posters, and one-on-one discussions. Much advice is provided about good qualities of
visions (clear, unambiguous, “blurry,” personally relevant, simple, vivid) but not much detail is given
about how the vision should be disseminated. The most prevalent advice appears to assume that if many
are involved in the creation of vision, many will understand and internalize it.
Be Motivational in Communication
A few authors touch on the issue of motivational communication. Implied definitions of
“motivation” varied from images of “cheerleading” and building “espirit de corps” (Prichett & Pound,
1994) to the metaphor of kicking people in the pants (Miller, 2002) to redesigning organizational rewards
to support needed behavioral changes (Ackerman Anderson & Anderson, 2001). Those who favored
motivational communication included tactics such as encouraging risk taking (Pritchett & Pound, 1994),
paying compliments, writing short notes to employees, singling people out for praise (Pritchett & Pound,
1994; Heller, 1998). Collins (2001) argues that “spending time trying to motivate people is a waste of


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