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Advice to Practitioners: A Review of the Popular Press Literature on Planned Change Communication
Unformatted Document Text:  Advice to Practitioners - 6 this view by linking change to the global shift from an industrial-age economy to an information economy. Moss Kanter (2002) points specifically to globalization, information technology and industry consolidation as causing change. Kotter (1996) links change to the emergence of the globalized economy. Some authors such as Heller (1998) couch this aspect of change as one that is not necessarily specifically linked to current global and technological advances, but nonetheless emerges from these same types of general pressures when he notes that change is caused by social trends, economics and technological trends.. As a result of the pressures of modern life, technology and globalization, organizations are changing, will change or must deal with change. Modern life and change are synonymous for these authors and organizations that operate in modern times encounter change as a result of the times in which they exist. Ubiquitous/Inevitable A second theme prevalent in the literature characterizes change as ubiquitous or inevitable. Magruder Watkins and Mohr (2001) exemplify this theme when they note, As the illusion that there can be a stable environment fades, organizations are embracing the challenge of thriving in a world of constant change, realizing that change is not a force acting on organizations, but the very water in which organizations swim. (p. xxxi – xxxii). Cameron and Quinn (1999) draw upon a life-cycle model of the organization to explicate that while the changes an organization faces are different as the organization matures, changes do exist at every phase. Johnson (1988) asserts that change is “constant” (p. 88) and Collins states that change is “reality” for organizations. Dupuy (2002) summarizes this view by noting “Change exists. This is an undisputable fact and there is little point in spending too much time and effort on expounding it” (p. xii). Necessary Survival Mechanism

Authors: Lewis, Laurie., Stephens, Keri., Schmisseur, Amy. and Weir, Kathleen.
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Advice to Practitioners - 6
this view by linking change to the global shift from an industrial-age economy to an information
economy. Moss Kanter (2002) points specifically to globalization, information technology and industry
consolidation as causing change. Kotter (1996) links change to the emergence of the globalized economy.
Some authors such as Heller (1998) couch this aspect of change as one that is not necessarily specifically
linked to current global and technological advances, but nonetheless emerges from these same types of
general pressures when he notes that change is caused by social trends, economics and technological
trends..
As a result of the pressures of modern life, technology and globalization, organizations are
changing, will change or must deal with change. Modern life and change are synonymous for these
authors and organizations that operate in modern times encounter change as a result of the times in which
they exist.
Ubiquitous/Inevitable
A second theme prevalent in the literature characterizes change as ubiquitous or inevitable.
Magruder Watkins and Mohr (2001) exemplify this theme when they note,
As the illusion that there can be a stable environment fades, organizations are embracing
the challenge of thriving in a world of constant change, realizing that change is not a
force acting on organizations, but the very water in which organizations swim. (p. xxxi –
xxxii).
Cameron and Quinn (1999) draw upon a life-cycle model of the organization to explicate that while the
changes an organization faces are different as the organization matures, changes do exist at every phase.
Johnson (1988) asserts that change is “constant” (p. 88) and Collins states that change is “reality” for
organizations. Dupuy (2002) summarizes this view by noting “Change exists. This is an undisputable fact
and there is little point in spending too much time and effort on expounding it” (p. xii).
Necessary Survival Mechanism


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