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Advice to Practitioners: A Review of the Popular Press Literature on Planned Change Communication
Unformatted Document Text:  Advice to Practitioners - 7 A third theme suggests that change is necessary for organizational survival. In this conceptualization of organizational change, organizations must change or perish. Bridges (1991) notes that organizations that do not or will not change “can drift into trouble” (p. 36). Carter, Giber & Goldsmith (2001) use case studies of organizations that have made successful changes in order to illustrate that change is necessary for corporate survival. Senge (2002) draws upon evolutionary language to describing change. He notes that there is a fundamental principle that allows change to occur in nature and that this functions by preserving a small set of essential features and allowing everything else to change. Collins (2001) lays out a model of change that organizations must follow in order to make the leap to a better, more highly performing type of company. Mysterious or Dangerous Change as impenetrable or in some way potentially harmful to the organization is the fourth theme that emerged in our analysis. Duck (2001) labels change a “monster” and presents a view of change as something that can be larger than life, scary and intimidating. As noted earlier, Conner (1992) typifies change as a jungle that can offer both danger and opportunity. Maurer (1996) says that change is unsettling and points to the large number of failed changes as proof that change can be a risky undertaking for organizations. The mystery associated with change is oftentimes embodied in people’s reactions to changes. Cameron and Quinn (1999) note that for many individuals, change is typically accompanied by “frightening uncertainty” (p. 1). Pritchett and Pound (1994) assert that change can be aggravating and confusing (p. 3). Further, they say that change causes a higher level of uncertainty for employees. Decision The final theme that emerged among the various characterizations of the nature of change is change as an organizational decision. These authors focus on change as something that organizations proactively choose to do rather than something that happens to an organization. Eckes (2001) offers a specific type of change that he presents as a management philosophy. Senge et. al., (1999) present change as an exploration that organizations undertake in a very deliberate manner. Davidson (2002) states his

Authors: Lewis, Laurie., Stephens, Keri., Schmisseur, Amy. and Weir, Kathleen.
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Advice to Practitioners - 7
A third theme suggests that change is necessary for organizational survival. In this
conceptualization of organizational change, organizations must change or perish. Bridges (1991) notes
that organizations that do not or will not change “can drift into trouble” (p. 36). Carter, Giber &
Goldsmith (2001) use case studies of organizations that have made successful changes in order to
illustrate that change is necessary for corporate survival. Senge (2002) draws upon evolutionary language
to describing change. He notes that there is a fundamental principle that allows change to occur in nature
and that this functions by preserving a small set of essential features and allowing everything else to
change. Collins (2001) lays out a model of change that organizations must follow in order to make the
leap to a better, more highly performing type of company.
Mysterious or Dangerous
Change as impenetrable or in some way potentially harmful to the organization is the fourth theme
that emerged in our analysis. Duck (2001) labels change a “monster” and presents a view of change as
something that can be larger than life, scary and intimidating. As noted earlier, Conner (1992) typifies
change as a jungle that can offer both danger and opportunity. Maurer (1996) says that change is
unsettling and points to the large number of failed changes as proof that change can be a risky undertaking
for organizations. The mystery associated with change is oftentimes embodied in people’s reactions to
changes. Cameron and Quinn (1999) note that for many individuals, change is typically accompanied by
“frightening uncertainty” (p. 1). Pritchett and Pound (1994) assert that change can be aggravating and
confusing (p. 3). Further, they say that change causes a higher level of uncertainty for employees.
Decision
The final theme that emerged among the various characterizations of the nature of change is
change as an organizational decision. These authors focus on change as something that organizations
proactively choose to do rather than something that happens to an organization. Eckes (2001) offers a
specific type of change that he presents as a management philosophy. Senge et. al., (1999) present change
as an exploration that organizations undertake in a very deliberate manner. Davidson (2002) states his


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