All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Advice to Practitioners: A Review of the Popular Press Literature on Planned Change Communication
Unformatted Document Text:  Advice to Practitioners - 9 Empowering Subordinates. In this category, change agents give other organizational members the requisite resources to conduct the change process. Belasco (1991) asserts that after creating a new tomorrow, change agents must empower their employees to live that vision. Further, he calls for change agents to empower individual change agents at all levels inside the organization. Bridges (1991) calls for change agents to give others a part to play in planning and in the outcome itself. Oakley and Krug (1991) say that a good leader knows that relaxing control yields results and teaches the importance of self- responsibility to his or her subordinates. Kegan and Laskow Lahey (2001) assert that leaders need to focus more on creating different channels and contexts for others to talk rather than on talking too much themselves. Resistance to Change Many authors of these books discuss how individuals in organizations resist change efforts. Themes related to resistance to change are summarized in Table 4. Several authors describe resistance in a consistent manner throughout their texts, such as Senge’s (1999) belief that resistance is often caused by problems in leadership. A much more common approach is to identify different types of resistance (e.g. Heller, 1998). In the themes we discuss below, the authors address overarching philosophies about resistance and potential causes of resistance. Overarching Character of Resistance Resistance is Natural. A great majority of the books we examined espouse the philosophy that resistance is natural. Eckes (2001) sums up this theme with his comment, “resistance is a natural, often genetic reaction to any change in our lives” (p. xii). The idea that reactions to change are “genetic” (p. xii) implies that nothing can be done to avoid resistance. Ackerman, Anderson, and Anderson (2001) explain that, “resistance is a person’s behavioral expression” (p. 202) of the underlying causes of the resistance. A few authors attempt to present this view as neutral, such as Senge, Kleiner, Roberts, Ross, Roth and Smith (1999). They dedicate an entire chapter to the fear and anxiety surrounding resistance.

Authors: Lewis, Laurie., Stephens, Keri., Schmisseur, Amy. and Weir, Kathleen.
first   previous   Page 9 of 41   next   last



background image
Advice to Practitioners - 9
Empowering Subordinates. In this category, change agents give other organizational members the
requisite resources to conduct the change process. Belasco (1991) asserts that after creating a new
tomorrow, change agents must empower their employees to live that vision. Further, he calls for change
agents to empower individual change agents at all levels inside the organization. Bridges (1991) calls for
change agents to give others a part to play in planning and in the outcome itself. Oakley and Krug (1991)
say that a good leader knows that relaxing control yields results and teaches the importance of self-
responsibility to his or her subordinates. Kegan and Laskow Lahey (2001) assert that leaders need to
focus more on creating different channels and contexts for others to talk rather than on talking too much
themselves.
Resistance to Change
Many authors of these books discuss how individuals in organizations resist change efforts.
Themes related to resistance to change are summarized in Table 4. Several authors describe resistance in
a consistent manner throughout their texts, such as Senge’s (1999) belief that resistance is often caused by
problems in leadership. A much more common approach is to identify different types of resistance (e.g.
Heller, 1998). In the themes we discuss below, the authors address overarching philosophies about
resistance and potential causes of resistance.
Overarching Character of Resistance
Resistance is Natural. A great majority of the books we examined espouse the philosophy that
resistance is natural. Eckes (2001) sums up this theme with his comment, “resistance is a natural, often
genetic reaction to any change in our lives” (p. xii). The idea that reactions to change are “genetic” (p.
xii) implies that nothing can be done to avoid resistance. Ackerman, Anderson, and Anderson (2001)
explain that, “resistance is a person’s behavioral expression” (p. 202) of the underlying causes of the
resistance. A few authors attempt to present this view as neutral, such as Senge, Kleiner, Roberts, Ross,
Roth and Smith (1999). They dedicate an entire chapter to the fear and anxiety surrounding resistance.


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 9 of 41   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.