All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Exploring the Boundaries of Heroes, Celebrities and Role Models after 9/11: Lessons from Shanksville
Unformatted Document Text:  Lessons from Shanksville p. 2 Exploring the Boundaries of Heroes, Celebrities and Role Models after 9/11: Lessons from Shanksville Perhaps no single event has had more influence on the people of the United States since the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor than the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. Since the attacks, many thousands of people have visited the temporary memorial sites that were spontaneously created in New York City, at the Pentagon, and in a small field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. To date, thousands of people continue to visit these three sites. The purpose of this study is to assess how the attacks of 9/11 might have changed the boundaries of how people role model heroes and celebrities. The study was carried out by interviewing visitors to the crash site of United Airlines Flight 93. From Heroes to Celebrities In 1961, Boorstin sparked an important discussion about the shifting border between heroes and celebrities. He saw a transition from the “hero” in popular culture to a fixation on “celebrities.” Several other scholars supported Boorstin’s claim, observing that the role of traditional heroes as role models for behavior has been replaced by celebrities (Braudy, 1986; Campbell, 1988; Gamson, 1994). Debate about the powerful influence of celebrities was brought to national attention about ten years ago by former NBA star Charles Barkley. During a run-in with a heckler in a 1993 basketball game, Barkley accidentally spit on a little girl in his attempt to retaliate against the heckler. When Barkley’s critics pointed out that his behavior was totally unacceptable because he was a public role model, Barkley responded that he did not desire to be a role model, a position he felt should be filled by parents. One of

Authors: Brown, William. and Fraser, Benson.
first   previous   Page 3 of 22   next   last



background image
Lessons from Shanksville
p. 2
Exploring the Boundaries of Heroes, Celebrities and Role Models after 9/11:
Lessons from Shanksville
Perhaps no single event has had more influence on the people of the United States
since the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor than the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.
Since the attacks, many thousands of people have visited the temporary memorial sites
that were spontaneously created in New York City, at the Pentagon, and in a small field in
Shanksville, Pennsylvania. To date, thousands of people continue to visit these three sites.
The purpose of this study is to assess how the attacks of 9/11 might have changed the
boundaries of how people role model heroes and celebrities. The study was carried out by
interviewing visitors to the crash site of United Airlines Flight 93.
From Heroes to Celebrities
In 1961, Boorstin sparked an important discussion about the shifting border
between heroes and celebrities. He saw a transition from the “hero” in popular culture to
a fixation on “celebrities.” Several other scholars supported Boorstin’s claim, observing
that the role of traditional heroes as role models for behavior has been replaced by
celebrities (Braudy, 1986; Campbell, 1988; Gamson, 1994).
Debate about the powerful influence of celebrities was brought to national
attention about ten years ago by former NBA star Charles Barkley. During a run-in with a
heckler in a 1993 basketball game, Barkley accidentally spit on a little girl in his attempt
to retaliate against the heckler. When Barkley’s critics pointed out that his behavior was
totally unacceptable because he was a public role model, Barkley responded that he did
not desire to be a role model, a position he felt should be filled by parents. One of


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 22   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.