All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

A Web of Alliances in the Global Telecommunication Industry
Unformatted Document Text:  Global Telecommunication 14 (Bonacich, 1987). This measure assumes that “an actor’s centrality is a function of the centralities of those actors with whom the actor has direct ties” (Brass & Burkhardt, 1993, p.195). In this analysis, UCINET 5.0 is used to calculate the centrality of the networks (Borgatti et al., 1999). Cluster Analysis. Cluster analysis identifies relational groupings or clusters of nodes that represent their measured relations. The purpose of cluster analysis is to classify nodes into subgroups that have similar relationships (Aldenderfer & Blashfield, 1984). It assesses the similarity between nodes. Various clustering methods have been used for studying meaningful blocks in the social structure. According to Mohr (1998), “clustering methods tend to connect items to clusters that are deemed (by some criteria) to be most similar in a localized (or pairwise) sense” (p.357). In this paper, Johnson’s hierarchical cluster analysis from UCINET 5.0 (Borgatti, et al., 1999) is used. Blockmodelling. Blockmodelling examines the relationships between or within blocks that are comprised of actors who share similar positions in the network (Giuffre, 1999). Blockmodelling is used for exploring actors’ structural positions in the networks. More specifically, an analysis of blockmodel is “to represent patterns in complex social network data in simplified form, to reveal sets of actors who are similarly embedded in networks of relations, and to describe the associations among relations in multi-relational social networks” (Faust & Wasserman, 1992). In order to examine the relationships among linkage blocks, the partitioning of positions is done based on relational similarity among media firms (Frank, 1995, 1996; Kim & Barnett, 2000). The analysis is performed by UCINET 5.0 (Borgatti, et al., 1999). Results

Authors: Chon, Bum Soo. and Barnett, George.
first   previous   Page 14 of 31   next   last



background image
Global Telecommunication 14
(Bonacich, 1987). This measure assumes that “an actor’s centrality is a function of the centralities
of those actors with whom the actor has direct ties” (Brass & Burkhardt, 1993, p.195). In this
analysis, UCINET 5.0 is used to calculate the centrality of the networks (Borgatti et al., 1999).
Cluster Analysis. Cluster analysis identifies relational groupings or clusters of nodes that
represent their measured relations. The purpose of cluster analysis is to classify nodes into
subgroups that have similar relationships (Aldenderfer & Blashfield, 1984). It assesses the
similarity between nodes. Various clustering methods have been used for studying meaningful
blocks in the social structure. According to Mohr (1998), “clustering methods tend to connect
items to clusters that are deemed (by some criteria) to be most similar in a localized (or pairwise)
sense” (p.357). In this paper, Johnson’s hierarchical cluster analysis from UCINET 5.0 (Borgatti,
et al., 1999) is used.
Blockmodelling. Blockmodelling examines the relationships between or within blocks
that are comprised of actors who share similar positions in the network (Giuffre, 1999).
Blockmodelling is used for exploring actors’ structural positions in the networks. More
specifically, an analysis of blockmodel is “to represent patterns in complex social network data in
simplified form, to reveal sets of actors who are similarly embedded in networks of relations, and
to describe the associations among relations in multi-relational social networks” (Faust &
Wasserman, 1992). In order to examine the relationships among linkage blocks, the partitioning
of positions is done based on relational similarity among media firms (Frank, 1995, 1996; Kim &
Barnett, 2000). The analysis is performed by UCINET 5.0 (Borgatti, et al., 1999).
Results


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 14 of 31   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.