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A Web of Alliances in the Global Telecommunication Industry
Unformatted Document Text:  Global Telecommunication 5 An organizational field includes commonalities that are partly or wholly shared among members through interorganizational networks (Knoke & Rogers, 1979). More concretely, in their discussion of organizational fields, DiMaggio and Powell (1983) define the organizational field as “a recognized area of institutional life: key suppliers, resource and product consumers, regulatory agencies and other organizations that provide similar services and products” (p.65). In this respect, the field is not a simple aggregation of market actors within certain industrial boundaries, but a relational space located between markets and environments. More specifically, DiMaggio and Powell (1983) argue that the organizational field consists of the following four parts: An increase in the extent of interaction among organizations in the field; the emergence of sharply defined interorganizational structures of domination and patterns of coalition; an increase in the information load with which organizations in a field must contend; and the development of a mutual awareness among participants in a set of organizations that they are involved in a common enterprise (DiMaggio & Powell, 1983, p.148). Consequently, the field idea encompasses three factors in understanding the formations and developments of markets or industries. The first factor is connectedness, which refers to interlinkage or interaction among actors. Those relationships can be treated as a whole system beyond dyadic relationships. The second one is patterns of coalitions among actors, or the partitioning of networks. For the structural analysis of the interorganizational network, “partitioning a population of organization into subpopulations and examining the relationships among the subpopulations is essential” (DiMaggio, 1986, p.339). The third component is the

Authors: Chon, Bum Soo. and Barnett, George.
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Global Telecommunication 5
An organizational field includes commonalities that are partly or wholly shared among
members through interorganizational networks (Knoke & Rogers, 1979). More concretely, in
their discussion of organizational fields, DiMaggio and Powell (1983) define the organizational
field as “a recognized area of institutional life: key suppliers, resource and product consumers,
regulatory agencies and other organizations that provide similar services and products” (p.65). In
this respect, the field is not a simple aggregation of market actors within certain industrial
boundaries, but a relational space located between markets and environments.
More specifically, DiMaggio and Powell (1983) argue that the organizational field
consists of the following four parts:
An increase in the extent of interaction among organizations in the field; the
emergence of sharply defined interorganizational structures of domination and
patterns of coalition; an increase in the information load with which
organizations in a field must contend; and the development of a mutual
awareness among participants in a set of organizations that they are involved
in a common enterprise (DiMaggio & Powell, 1983, p.148).
Consequently, the field idea encompasses three factors in understanding the formations
and developments of markets or industries. The first factor is connectedness, which refers to
interlinkage or interaction among actors. Those relationships can be treated as a whole system
beyond dyadic relationships. The second one is patterns of coalitions among actors, or the
partitioning of networks. For the structural analysis of the interorganizational network,
“partitioning a population of organization into subpopulations and examining the relationships
among the subpopulations is essential” (DiMaggio, 1986, p.339). The third component is the


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