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Access to the Media Versus Access to Audiences: The Distinction and its Implications for Media Regulation and Policy

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Abstract:

When the issue of speakers' rights of access arises in media regulation and policy contexts, the focus typically is on the concept of speakers' rights of access "to the media," or "to the press." This right typically is premised on the audience's need for access to diverse sources and content. In contrast, in many non-mediated contexts, the concept of speakers' rights of access frequently is defined in terms of the speaker's own First Amendment right of access to audiences. This paper explores the distinctions between these differing interpretations of a speaker's access rights and argues that the concept of a speaker's right of access to audiences merits a more prominent position in media regulation and policy. This paper then explores the implications of such a shift in perspective for media regulation and policy-making.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

access (255), right (157), audienc (150), first (120), media (114), amend (111), speaker (89), polici (45), court (42), concept (37), public (37), context (30), decis (28), individu (28), communic (25), note (24), cabl (22), upon (22), valu (22), forum (22), extent (22),

Author's Keywords:

First Amendment, access, media regulation, media policy
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Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


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MLA Citation:

Napoli, Philip. "Access to the Media Versus Access to Audiences: The Distinction and its Implications for Media Regulation and Policy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111624_index.html>

APA Citation:

Napoli, P. , 2003-05-27 "Access to the Media Versus Access to Audiences: The Distinction and its Implications for Media Regulation and Policy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111624_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: When the issue of speakers' rights of access arises in media regulation and policy contexts, the focus typically is on the concept of speakers' rights of access "to the media," or "to the press." This right typically is premised on the audience's need for access to diverse sources and content. In contrast, in many non-mediated contexts, the concept of speakers' rights of access frequently is defined in terms of the speaker's own First Amendment right of access to audiences. This paper explores the distinctions between these differing interpretations of a speaker's access rights and argues that the concept of a speaker's right of access to audiences merits a more prominent position in media regulation and policy. This paper then explores the implications of such a shift in perspective for media regulation and policy-making.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 24
Word count: 8022
Text sample:
Access to the Media Versus Access to Audiences: The Distinction and its Implications for Media Regulation and Policy 2 Access to the Media Versus Access to Audiences: The Distinction and its Implications for Media Regulation and Policy Abstract When the issue of speakers’ rights of access arises in media regulation and policy contexts the focus typically is on the concept of speakers’ rights of access “to the media ” or “to the press.” This right typically is premised on
value neither the policy-makers nor the courts been bringing the full force of the First Amendment to bear on their decisions. The application of this right of access to audiences in mediated communication contexts can – and should – be premised upon traditional First Amendment notions of individualistic free speech values as opposed to (or at least in addition to) collectivist values. Certainly preserving and promoting speakers’ First Amendment rights of access to audiences likely would simultaneously serve collectivist


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