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How very young children use gaze avoidance to resist caregiver interventions in their acts of misconduct
Unformatted Document Text:  11 CG: [Robert= [CG is moving toward B1 [B1 is gazing at B2, waving shark in air, backing away from CG 12 B1: [=rrr[rrrr= ((flying noise)) [CG is moving toward B1 [B1is gazing at B2, waving shark in air, backing away from CG 13 CG: [Robert= [CG is moving toward B1 [B1 is gazing at B2, waving shark in air, backing away from CG 14 B1: =brrrr[rr 15 CG: [Excuse me. [CG gets hold of B1’s hand 16 CG: [Excu[se me. [CG pulls B2 toward her to face her 17 CG: [brrrrr 18 CG: He is playing. I am [-- [CG is wresting object from B1’s grip, looking directly into B1’s eyes [B1 is facing, gazing at CG 19 B1: [AEHhhhh! ahah ((loud protest screech, then “sob” as object is taken from him)) In CASE 7, we see that caregivers not only take children’s refusal to look at them, along with other behaviors, as an indicator of non- compliance, but they seek children’s return gaze as part of an upgraded course of action designed to secure compliance. In CASE 7, “shark”, the caregiver brings B1 around to face her and looks into his eyes when she makes the corrective utterance: “He is playing” (line 18); she does this just at the point that she is able to wrest the object from B1, and force compliance on him. The same

Authors: Kidwell, Mardi.
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11 CG:
[Robert=
[CG is moving toward B1
[B1 is gazing at B2, waving shark in air, backing away from CG
12 B1: [=rrr[rrrr= ((flying noise))
[CG is moving toward B1
[B1is gazing at B2, waving shark in air, backing away from CG
13
CG: [Robert=
[CG is moving toward B1
[B1 is gazing at B2, waving shark in air, backing away from CG
14
B1: =brrrr[rr
15
CG: [Excuse me.
[CG gets hold of B1’s hand
16
CG: [Excu[se me.
[CG pulls B2 toward her to face her
17
CG: [brrrrr
18
CG: He is playing. I am [--
[CG is wresting object from B1’s grip, looking directly into B1’s eyes
[B1 is facing, gazing at CG
19
B1:
[AEHhhhh! ahah ((loud protest screech, then “sob” as object is
taken from him))
In CASE 7, we see that caregivers not only take children’s refusal to look at them, along with other
behaviors, as an indicator of non- compliance, but they seek children’s return gaze as part of an upgraded
course of action designed to secure compliance. In CASE 7, “shark”, the caregiver brings B1 around to face
her and looks into his eyes when she makes the corrective utterance: “He is playing” (line 18); she does this
just at the point that she is able to wrest the object from B1, and force compliance on him. The same


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