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How very young children use gaze avoidance to resist caregiver interventions in their acts of misconduct
Unformatted Document Text:  Indeed, such is the power of mutual gaze between CGs and children that CGs sometimes do not have to say anything to children, as CASE 11 demonstrates. Sometimes children only have to look and find a caregiver looking at them to give up a line of misconduct: CASE 11: “faceoff” CG: looks at B1 and B2; B1 is pushing B2 B1: looks up at CG, stops pushing; walks over and stands by CG with a deferent look That compliance by children frequently comes at points of their gaze return toward the caregiver provides part of the explanation for why caregivers pursue gaze return, and children resist it. At issue, too, however, is how gaze return by children organizationally constitutes them as recipients of caregivers’ interventions. Conclusion In sum, this paper has been concerned with how participants attend one another in interaction, and the import of their attention for a course of action. Specifically, it has examined the consequences of very young children’s unwillingness, and refusal to gaze at a caregiver who is seeking their gaze return as part of a strategy to get their compliance in giving up a line of misconduct. An important issue raised in this paper, indirectly, is that of very young children’s agency with respect to how such a basic and pervasive interactional resource as being able to regulate where one looks enables them to persist in their own interactional projects, in spite of others’ efforts to get them to stop, and in spite of their own limitations with regard to other resources they might mobilize in order to resist: e.g., language. A goal of this paper has been to demonstrate something about very young children’s emerging orientations to the visibility of their

Authors: Kidwell, Mardi.
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Indeed, such is the power of mutual gaze between CGs and children that CGs sometimes do not have to
say anything to children, as CASE 11 demonstrates. Sometimes children only have to look and find a
caregiver looking at them to give up a line of misconduct:
CASE 11: “faceoff”
CG: looks at B1 and B2; B1 is pushing B2
B1: looks up at CG, stops pushing; walks over and stands by CG with a deferent look
That compliance by children frequently comes at points of their gaze return toward the caregiver
provides part of the explanation for why caregivers pursue gaze return, and children resist it. At issue, too,
however, is how gaze return by children organizationally constitutes them as recipients of caregivers’
interventions.
Conclusion
In sum, this paper has been concerned with how participants attend one another in interaction, and the
import of their attention for a course of action. Specifically, it has examined the consequences of very
young children’s unwillingness, and refusal to gaze at a caregiver who is seeking their gaze return as part of
a strategy to get their compliance in giving up a line of misconduct. An important issue raised in this paper,
indirectly, is that of very young children’s agency with respect to how such a basic and pervasive
interactional resource as being able to regulate where one looks enables them to persist in their own
interactional projects, in spite of others’ efforts to get them to stop, and in spite of their own limitations
with regard to other resources they might mobilize in order to resist: e.g., language. A goal of this paper has
been to demonstrate something about very young children’s emerging orientations to the visibility of their


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