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How very young children use gaze avoidance to resist caregiver interventions in their acts of misconduct
Unformatted Document Text:  involves both verbal and physical moves, caregivers seek to bring their eye gaze in line with children’s, particularly when children are slow to give up their line of misconduct. Indeed, children’s avoidance of the caregiver’s gaze is treated by the caregiver as specifically constituting a course of resistance, even defiance. As part of a strategy of securing compliance from “misbehaving” children, caregivers insist on a child’s return gaze as they address her or him, and treat the absence of return gaze itself as a sanctionable matter, one that is closely tied up with a child’s refusal to comply. I CHILD MISCONDUCT / CAREGIVER INTERVENTION IS AN ORDERED RELATIONSHIP. When children engage in certain sorts of activities--for example when they hit, bite, push, or take toys away from other children—caregivers, consistent with their dual roles as adults and paid guardians of children’s well-being--regularly respond by taking action to get them to stop. CHILD MISCONDUCT/ADULT INTERVENTION 1 constitutes a discernible orderliness in the daycare environment, and provides for the organization of children’s and caregivers’ looking behavior in ways that I shall subsequently address in this paper. Consider the following cases: CASE 1: “box” Boy: Hits children over the head with box several times CG: Runs over, grabs hold of box, says, That’s not okay Enzo. 1 I have avoided using the term “sequence” to avoid the implication that the orderliness under examination here is the same as that that orders sequences of talk. In other words, the relationship between child misconduct/caregiver intervention is by no means considered an adjacency pair relationship.

Authors: Kidwell, Mardi.
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involves both verbal and physical moves, caregivers seek to bring their eye gaze in line with children’s,
particularly when children are slow to give up their line of misconduct. Indeed, children’s avoidance of the
caregiver’s gaze is treated by the caregiver as specifically constituting a course of resistance, even defiance.
As part of a strategy of securing compliance from “misbehaving” children, caregivers insist on a child’s
return gaze as they address her or him, and treat the absence of return gaze itself as a sanctionable matter,
one that is closely tied up with a child’s refusal to comply.
I CHILD MISCONDUCT / CAREGIVER INTERVENTION IS AN ORDERED RELATIONSHIP.
When children engage in certain sorts of activities--for example when they hit, bite, push, or take toys
away from other children—caregivers, consistent with their dual roles as adults and paid guardians of
children’s well-being--regularly respond by taking action to get them to stop. CHILD
MISCONDUCT/ADULT INTERVENTION
1
constitutes a discernible orderliness in the daycare
environment, and provides for the organization of children’s and caregivers’ looking behavior in ways that I
shall subsequently address in this paper. Consider the following cases:
CASE 1: “box”
Boy:
Hits children over the head with box several times
CG:
Runs over, grabs hold of box, says, That’s not okay Enzo.
1
I have avoided using the term “sequence” to avoid the implication that the orderliness under examination
here is the same as that that orders sequences of talk. In other words, the relationship between child
misconduct/caregiver intervention is by no means considered an adjacency pair relationship.


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