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How very young children use gaze avoidance to resist caregiver interventions in their acts of misconduct
Unformatted Document Text:  CASE 2: “hairpull” Girl: Grabs onto boy’s hair and face CG: Aubrey let go please. Moves toward G, takes hold of her hand. CASE 3: “my seat” Girl: Grabs hold of boy’s vest, starts to bring her mouth to it CG: Hurriedly steps over to children, leans down and takes hold of girl’s hand, and says, I don’t want you to put your mouth on ‘em. In CASES 1-3, caregivers take actions to halt a line of conduct by a child with various verbal and physical interventions that consist, in CASE 1, of taking hold of the child to block a strike and uttering a negative assessment of the situation; in CASE 2, of wresting a child free of another child, and issuing a directive to perform a counter action; and in CASE 3, of wresting a child free of another child to prevent a bite, and issuing a negative directive (a prohibition) formulated as a need statement. Indeed, when caregivers do not intervene, this may be treated as a noticed absence by participants on the scene, as CASE 4 demonstrates. CASE 4: “lunch” In CASE 4, a girl sees a boy take a cracker from another boy when the caregiver’s back is turned. The girl first tries to draw the caregiver’s attention to the situation, then sanctions the boy herself; then, when the caregiver turns around, she tells her what happened. Interestingly, the caregiver offers an account for her failure to intervene.

Authors: Kidwell, Mardi.
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CASE 2: “hairpull
Girl:
Grabs onto boy’s hair and face
CG:
Aubrey let go please. Moves toward G, takes hold of her hand.
CASE 3: “my seat”
Girl:
Grabs hold of boy’s vest, starts to bring her mouth to it
CG:
Hurriedly steps over to children, leans down and takes hold of
girl’s hand, and says, I don’t want you to put your mouth on ‘em.
In CASES 1-3, caregivers take actions to halt a line of conduct by a child with various verbal and
physical interventions that consist, in CASE 1, of taking hold of the child to block a strike and uttering a
negative assessment of the situation; in CASE 2, of wresting a child free of another child, and issuing a
directive to perform a counter action; and in CASE 3, of wresting a child free of another child to prevent a
bite, and issuing a negative directive (a prohibition) formulated as a need statement. Indeed, when
caregivers do not intervene, this may be treated as a noticed absence by participants on the scene, as CASE
4 demonstrates.
CASE 4: “lunch”
In CASE 4, a girl sees a boy take a cracker from another boy when the caregiver’s back is
turned. The girl first tries to draw the caregiver’s attention to the situation, then sanctions the boy herself;
then, when the caregiver turns around, she tells her what happened. Interestingly, the caregiver offers an
account for her failure to intervene.


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