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How very young children use gaze avoidance to resist caregiver interventions in their acts of misconduct
Unformatted Document Text:  upon hearing her name called, as in CASE 5, or when the child stops the misconduct (or is made to stop), as in CASE 6, the corrective utterance is issued. In other words, caregivers treat what children do when their names have been called--looking to the caregiver --as a first step toward compliance, and one that constitutes them as recipients for a next action by the caregiver, the “corrective”, as in CASE 5. Or, as CASE 6 shows, a caregiver may physically intervene when calling a child’s name has not drawn his attention; following compliance in this case, a child is treated as a proper recipient of a “corrective”. “Correctives”, then, are made when compliance has been--or is about to be--achieved, and they are usually followed by sequence closure. In CASE 5, this was accomplished with a “thank you”, and in CASE 6, with the caregiver leaving the scene. Securing a child’ s compliance, however, is not always an easy matter for caregivers. Following is a discussion of cases involving children’s non-compliant behaviors, and caregivers’ efforts to get them to comply in the face of their ongoing resistance. IV CAREGIVERS “READ” CHILDREN’S BEHAVIOR FOR SIGNS OF COMPLIANCE; TREAT CHILDREN’S FAILURE TO LOOK, AND OTHER BODY BEHAVIORS, AS RESISTANCE TO COMPLIANCE At issue with these next cases is how caregivers “read” children’s behavior for signs of non- compliance, and treat their absence of return gaze as an important factor to be dealt with as part of overcoming their resistance. CASE 7: “shark” In CASE 7, the caregiver calls a child’s ( B1) name as he grabs onto a toy shark that another child (B2) has (line 3). B1 looks up, but maintains his grasp of the shark (line 4). The caregiver makes a “corrective” utterance (line 5), but as B1 is still holding onto the shark, she this as non-compliance and moves toward B1

Authors: Kidwell, Mardi.
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upon hearing her name called, as in CASE 5, or when the child stops the misconduct (or is made to stop), as
in CASE 6, the corrective utterance is issued. In other words, caregivers treat what children do when their
names have been called--looking to the caregiver --as a first step toward compliance, and one that
constitutes them as recipients for a next action by the caregiver, the “corrective”, as in CASE 5. Or, as
CASE 6 shows, a caregiver may physically intervene when calling a child’s name has not drawn his
attention; following compliance in this case, a child is treated as a proper recipient of a “corrective”.
“Correctives”, then, are made when compliance has been--or is about to be--achieved, and they are usually
followed by sequence closure. In CASE 5, this was accomplished with a “thank you”, and in CASE 6, with
the caregiver leaving the scene.
Securing a child’ s compliance, however, is not always an easy matter for caregivers. Following
is a discussion of cases involving children’s non-compliant behaviors, and caregivers’ efforts to get them to
comply in the face of their ongoing resistance.
IV CAREGIVERS “READ” CHILDREN’S BEHAVIOR FOR SIGNS OF COMPLIANCE; TREAT
CHILDREN’S FAILURE TO LOOK, AND OTHER BODY BEHAVIORS, AS RESISTANCE TO
COMPLIANCE
At issue with these next cases is how caregivers “read” children’s behavior for signs of non-
compliance, and treat their absence of return gaze as an important factor to be dealt with as part of
overcoming their resistance.
CASE 7: “shark”
In CASE 7, the caregiver calls a child’s ( B1) name as he grabs onto a toy shark that another child (B2)
has (line 3). B1 looks up, but maintains his grasp of the shark (line 4). The caregiver makes a “corrective”
utterance (line 5), but as B1 is still holding onto the shark, she this as non-compliance and moves toward B1


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