All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

El Dia de los Muertos American-style: Communicating with the Living
Unformatted Document Text:  11 Tracing the origins of the highly organized English working class to local traditions that emphasized decency and mutual aid, he argued that the widespread participation of common folk in traditional rituals and ceremonies sustained collectivist values which, in turn, allowed the working class to maintain solidarity under difficult political conditions. Culture, in Thompson’s view, was not simply an extraneous variable, but a political necessity in the struggle for justice. 34 Similarly, the collective Day of the Dead traditions of Latinos living in the United States help this population to maintain a sense of identity and solidarity in difficult political times. As the following examples illustrate, many US Day of the Dead activities “elevate the defense of the interests of the working community above those of the profits of a few.” 35 Moral arguments are enhanced by colorful and dramatic rituals that attract the attention of both the media and the general public in ways that ordinary political work does not. Because of the novelty of this holiday for most mainstream readers and the colorful photo opportunities available, Day of the Dead activities receive significant coverage in newspapers across the country, both in terms of promoting events beforehand and covering them afterwards. This attention is particularly noteworthy in a society where over 10 percent of the population is Latino but only one percent of national TV news focuses on Latinos 36 and only one percent of all characters on entertainment TV are Latinos (down from 3 percent in the 1950s). 37 While Latinos are severely underrepresented in magazine advertising 38 and negatively portrayed on film, 39 media coverage of Day of the Dead events is positive coverage that affirms the value of Latino culture and, in the 34 Jeffrey C. Alexander, Culture and Society: Contemporary Debates, p. 21. 35 Thompson, op. cit., p. 339. 36 See Cecilia Alvear, “No Chicanos on TV,” in Nieman Reports, Fall 1998, v.52, n.3, p. 49. 37 Center for Media and Public Affairs’ Distorted Reality study, cited in M. Portales, Crowding Out Latinos, p. 56. 38 Charles R. Taylor and Hae-Kyong Bang, “Portrayals of Latinos in magazine advertising,” in Journalism and Mass Communication Educator, Summer 1997, v.52, n.2, p. 285. 39 “Combating the network ‘brownout,’” Hispanic Business, October 1999, v.21, i10, p. 46.

Authors: Marchi, Regina Miriam.
first   previous   Page 11 of 21   next   last



background image
11
Tracing the origins of the highly organized English working class to local traditions that
emphasized decency and mutual aid, he argued that the widespread participation of common folk
in traditional rituals and ceremonies sustained collectivist values which, in turn, allowed the
working class to maintain solidarity under difficult political conditions. Culture, in Thompson’s
view, was not simply an extraneous variable, but a political necessity in the struggle for justice.
34
Similarly, the collective Day of the Dead traditions of Latinos living in the United States
help this population to maintain a sense of identity and solidarity in difficult political times. As
the following examples illustrate, many US Day of the Dead activities “elevate the defense of the
interests of the working community above those of the profits of a few.”
35
Moral arguments are
enhanced by colorful and dramatic rituals that attract the attention of both the media and the
general public in ways that ordinary political work does not. Because of the novelty of this
holiday for most mainstream readers and the colorful photo opportunities available, Day of the
Dead activities receive significant coverage in newspapers across the country, both in terms of
promoting events beforehand and covering them afterwards. This attention is particularly
noteworthy in a society where over 10 percent of the population is Latino but only one percent of
national TV news focuses on Latinos
36
and only one percent of all characters on entertainment
TV are Latinos (down from 3 percent in the 1950s).
37
While Latinos are severely
underrepresented in magazine advertising
38
and negatively portrayed on film,
39
media coverage of
Day of the Dead events is positive coverage that affirms the value of Latino culture and, in the
34
Jeffrey C. Alexander, Culture and Society: Contemporary Debates, p. 21.
35
Thompson, op. cit., p. 339.
36
See Cecilia Alvear, “No Chicanos on TV,” in Nieman Reports, Fall 1998, v.52, n.3, p. 49.
37
Center for Media and Public Affairs’ Distorted Reality study, cited in M. Portales, Crowding Out Latinos, p. 56.
38
Charles R. Taylor and Hae-Kyong Bang, “Portrayals of Latinos in magazine advertising,” in Journalism and Mass
Communication Educator, Summer 1997, v.52, n.2, p. 285.
39
“Combating the network ‘brownout,’” Hispanic Business, October 1999, v.21, i10, p. 46.


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 11 of 21   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.