All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

El Dia de los Muertos American-style: Communicating with the Living
Unformatted Document Text:  6 or criticizing the dominant social structural values. Through these “play” frames, argues Turner, celebrants can fabricate a range of alternative possibilities of behaving, thinking and feeling that extend beyond the confines of what is admissible in the obligatory ritual frame. 17 Such is the case with Day of the Dead celebrations, where activities considered obligatory by most practitioners in Latin America have become remarkably innovative forms of expression for practitioners in the US. Freed from the obligatory ritual frame, these ceremonies can express both cultural faith and political skepticism, commenting on a wide range of social issues and identities. A Subtext of Resistance: Before discussing politicized Day of the Dead activities in the US, it is worth observing the historical connection between Day of the Dead and resistance in Latin America. Much to the chagrin of Spanish missionaries in Mexico, Central America and South America, indigenous peoples forced into Catholicism resolutely retained native rituals of honoring their ancestors. 18 While Day of the Dead rituals were family rather than political activities, on a certain level, honoring the departed invited contemplation about the inequities of the socio-political status quo. To remember the dead, after all, is to remember how and why they died. In colonial times, death among the indigenous majority was, more often than not, the result of preventable phenomena such as malnutrition, poverty, or maltreatment by colonial authorities. Therefore, the period set aside each year to remember the dead was simultaneously a space in which the poor might express frustration towards the injustices of the existing social order responsible for so many 17 Turner, Secular Ritual, p. 42; and Celebration, p. 28. 18 Robert Ricard, The Spiritual Conquest of Mexico, 269-287; Steven J. Stern, Peru’s Indian Peoples and the Challenge of Spanish Conquest, p. 177; Stern, Resistance, Rebellion, and Consciousness in the Andean Peasant

Authors: Marchi, Regina Miriam.
first   previous   Page 6 of 21   next   last



background image
6
or criticizing the dominant social structural values. Through these “play” frames, argues Turner,
celebrants can fabricate a range of alternative possibilities of behaving, thinking and feeling that
extend beyond the confines of what is admissible in the obligatory ritual frame.
17
Such is the
case with Day of the Dead celebrations, where activities considered obligatory by most
practitioners in Latin America have become remarkably innovative forms of expression for
practitioners in the US. Freed from the obligatory ritual frame, these ceremonies can express
both cultural faith and political skepticism, commenting on a wide range of social issues and
identities.
A Subtext of Resistance:
Before discussing politicized Day of the Dead activities in the US, it is worth observing
the historical connection between Day of the Dead and resistance in Latin America. Much to the
chagrin of Spanish missionaries in Mexico, Central America and South America, indigenous
peoples forced into Catholicism resolutely retained native rituals of honoring their ancestors.
18
While Day of the Dead rituals were family rather than political activities, on a certain level,
honoring the departed invited contemplation about the inequities of the socio-political status quo.
To remember the dead, after all, is to remember how and why they died. In colonial times, death
among the indigenous majority was, more often than not, the result of preventable phenomena
such as malnutrition, poverty, or maltreatment by colonial authorities. Therefore, the period set
aside each year to remember the dead was simultaneously a space in which the poor might
express frustration towards the injustices of the existing social order responsible for so many
17
Turner, Secular Ritual, p. 42; and Celebration, p. 28.
18
Robert Ricard, The Spiritual Conquest of Mexico, 269-287; Steven J. Stern, Peru’s Indian Peoples and the
Challenge of Spanish Conquest, p. 177; Stern, Resistance, Rebellion, and Consciousness in the Andean Peasant


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 6 of 21   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.