All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

El Dia de los Muertos American-style: Communicating with the Living
Unformatted Document Text:  9 resistance to class exploitation. 28 Thus, while Day of the Dead in Latin America is primarily about dedication to family, there has also historically existed an undercurrent of contestation to oppressive authorities. In recent years, urban activists in Latin America (whose education and cosmopolitan lifestyles afford them the freedom to creatively employ traditional rituals) have sometimes drawn attention to social injustices through the creation of public Day of the Dead altars that comment on social relations of power. In Mexico City, altars have been created in memory of destroyed rainforests, murdered street children and AIDS victims. 29 During the civil war in El Salvador, altars were erected near the cathedral in San Salvador to honor slain Archbishop Oscar Romero and other social justice advocates killed by government military forces. 30 In Santiago, Chile, Day of the Dead processions have been held to remember the victims of the Pinochet regime. 31 On the whole, however, politicized altars comprise a small minority of the overall Day of the Dead activities occurring in Latin America, which are still overwhelmingly family rituals. US Day of the Dead as Political Communication In contrast, politicized altars and activities are a much greater part of Day of the Dead celebrations in the US, largely because of the holiday’s change in status from family-oriented ritual to choreographed, public “happening.” Freed from the traditional religious and social constraints prevalent in Latin America, Day of the Dead in the US becomes a self-reflexive expression of Latino identity that is performative and designed to communicate messages to a 28 For detailed political analyses of these figurines, see Juanita Garciagodoy’s Digging the Days of the Dead, and Susan Masuoka’s “Calavera Miniatures: Political Commentary in Three Dimensions,” in Studies in Latin American Popular Culture, volume 9, 1990. 29 Juanita Garciagodoy, Digging the Days of the Dead, p. 91. 30 Interview I conducted in May 2001 with Estela Guzman, Salvadoran activist.

Authors: Marchi, Regina Miriam.
first   previous   Page 9 of 21   next   last



background image
9
resistance to class exploitation.
28
Thus, while Day of the Dead in Latin America is primarily
about dedication to family, there has also historically existed an undercurrent of contestation to
oppressive authorities.
In recent years, urban activists in Latin America (whose education and cosmopolitan
lifestyles afford them the freedom to creatively employ traditional rituals) have sometimes drawn
attention to social injustices through the creation of public Day of the Dead altars that comment
on social relations of power. In Mexico City, altars have been created in memory of destroyed
rainforests, murdered street children and AIDS victims.
29
During the civil war in El Salvador,
altars were erected near the cathedral in San Salvador to honor slain Archbishop Oscar Romero
and other social justice advocates killed by government military forces.
30
In Santiago, Chile, Day
of the Dead processions have been held to remember the victims of the Pinochet regime.
31
On
the whole, however, politicized altars comprise a small minority of the overall Day of the Dead
activities occurring in Latin America, which are still overwhelmingly family rituals.
US Day of the Dead as Political Communication
In contrast, politicized altars and activities are a much greater part of Day of the Dead
celebrations in the US, largely because of the holiday’s change in status from family-oriented
ritual to choreographed, public “happening.” Freed from the traditional religious and social
constraints prevalent in Latin America, Day of the Dead in the US becomes a self-reflexive
expression of Latino identity that is performative and designed to communicate messages to a
28
For detailed political analyses of these figurines, see Juanita Garciagodoy’s Digging the Days of the Dead, and
Susan Masuoka’s “Calavera Miniatures: Political Commentary in Three Dimensions,” in Studies in Latin American
Popular Culture
, volume 9, 1990.
29
Juanita Garciagodoy, Digging the Days of the Dead, p. 91.
30
Interview I conducted in May 2001 with Estela Guzman, Salvadoran activist.


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 9 of 21   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.