All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

For whom is a picture worth a thousand words? How does the visualizing cognitive style affect processing of news photos?
Unformatted Document Text:  Processing of news photos 4 with different cognitive styles perceive images. People who prefer to learn from visuals should be more sensitive to aesthetic variations in photos. No previous studies have examined differences in how visualizers or verbalizers perceive images. Third, this study will expand upon an earlier study (Mendelson & Thorson, 1997) that revealed that verbalizers recalled more information from newspapers stories in a newspaper-reading situation (photos and stories), but there was no effect of visualizing. This study will use a picture-only situation to determine whether this lack of effects was due to how visualizing was measured or the nature of the newspaper reading task. Literature review Cognitive styles A key area of research in mass communications has focused on how individual differences affect attention to, perceptions of, and learning from various media. Miron, Bryant and Zillmann (2001) discuss a variety of individual differences that affect how children process television, including age, gender, intelligence, temperament and personality. Among the personality types discussed in this review article are Type A vs. Type B personalities, and introversion vs. extroversion. However, a concept that has not received much scrutiny by media researchers is cognitive style, a research concept heavily examined by education researchers. A cognitive style is an individual’s typical and consistent approach to organizing and processing information (Jackson & Lawty-Jones, 1995; Jonassen & Grabowski, 1993; Riding, et al., 1995; Sadler-Smith, 1996). Cognitive styles are different from learning strategies. “A style is considered to be a fairly fixed characteristic of an individual, while strategies are the ways that may be used to cope with situations and tasks” (Riding & Sadler-Smith, 1992, p. 323). As cognitive styles are stable and trait-like, they manifest themselves consistently over time and

Authors: Mendelson, Andrew.
first   previous   Page 4 of 31   next   last



background image
Processing of news photos
4
with different cognitive styles perceive images. People who prefer to learn from visuals should
be more sensitive to aesthetic variations in photos. No previous studies have examined
differences in how visualizers or verbalizers perceive images. Third, this study will expand upon
an earlier study (Mendelson & Thorson, 1997) that revealed that verbalizers recalled more
information from newspapers stories in a newspaper-reading situation (photos and stories), but
there was no effect of visualizing. This study will use a picture-only situation to determine
whether this lack of effects was due to how visualizing was measured or the nature of the
newspaper reading task.
Literature review
Cognitive styles
A key area of research in mass communications has focused on how individual
differences affect attention to, perceptions of, and learning from various media. Miron, Bryant
and Zillmann (2001) discuss a variety of individual differences that affect how children process
television, including age, gender, intelligence, temperament and personality. Among the
personality types discussed in this review article are Type A vs. Type B personalities, and
introversion vs. extroversion. However, a concept that has not received much scrutiny by media
researchers is cognitive style, a research concept heavily examined by education researchers. A
cognitive style is an individual’s typical and consistent approach to organizing and processing
information (Jackson & Lawty-Jones, 1995; Jonassen & Grabowski, 1993; Riding, et al., 1995;
Sadler-Smith, 1996). Cognitive styles are different from learning strategies. “A style is
considered to be a fairly fixed characteristic of an individual, while strategies are the ways that
may be used to cope with situations and tasks” (Riding & Sadler-Smith, 1992, p. 323). As
cognitive styles are stable and trait-like, they manifest themselves consistently over time and


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 4 of 31   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.