All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

For whom is a picture worth a thousand words? How does the visualizing cognitive style affect processing of news photos?
Unformatted Document Text:  Processing of news photos 5 across situations. In education research, it has been shown that learning is highly determined by matching a person’s cognitive style to the instructional method (Kogan, 1971; Lesser, 1971; Witkin et al., 1977). Though a number of different cognitive styles have been examined, this study examines how individual differences in visualizer and/or verbalizer cognitive styles affect the processing of news photographs. The visualizer/verbalizer cognitive style 1 focuses on different preferences for attending to and learning from visual as opposed to verbal information (Jonassen & Grabowski, 1993). A person who has a verbalizing style is word-oriented, shows high fluency with words, prefers to read about ideas, and enjoys word games. A person who has a visualizing style is image-oriented, prefers to have someone show them how to do things, and enjoys visual games such as jigsaw puzzles. Further, visualizers, being more image-oriented, have greater fluency with illustrations, understanding their subtleties, while verbalizers are better at understanding semantic complexity (Jonassen & Grabowski, 1993; Riding & Ashmore, 1980). 2 Originally, the visualizer and verbalizer concepts were thought to be opposite ends of a continuum (Richardson, 1977). A person either preferred to learn from visuals or s/he preferred to learn from words (Jonassen & Grabowski, 1993). More recently, however, this idea has given way to the view that these concepts are distinct (Antonietti & Giorgetti, 1998; Green & Schroeder, 1990; Kirby, Moore & Schofield, 1988; Parrott, 1986; Schroeder, 1989). A person might prefer to learn from both words and visuals; i.e., be a visual learner and a verbal learner. To bolster their argument, Kirby et al. (1988) showed that Richardson’s Visualizer Verbalizer Questionnaire (VVQ) did not form a single scale. They derived new scales to measure visualizing and verbalizing, based on a three-factor solution: a verbal dimension, a visual 1 Riding and colleagues (Riding & Ashmore, 1980; Riding, Burton, Rees, & Sharratt, 1995; Riding, & Sadler-Smith, 1992).

Authors: Mendelson, Andrew.
first   previous   Page 5 of 31   next   last



background image
Processing of news photos
5
across situations. In education research, it has been shown that learning is highly determined by
matching a person’s cognitive style to the instructional method (Kogan, 1971; Lesser, 1971;
Witkin et al., 1977).
Though a number of different cognitive styles have been examined, this study examines
how individual differences in visualizer and/or verbalizer cognitive styles affect the processing
of news photographs. The visualizer/verbalizer cognitive style
1
focuses on different preferences
for attending to and learning from visual as opposed to verbal information (Jonassen &
Grabowski, 1993). A person who has a verbalizing style is word-oriented, shows high fluency
with words, prefers to read about ideas, and enjoys word games. A person who has a visualizing
style is image-oriented, prefers to have someone show them how to do things, and enjoys visual
games such as jigsaw puzzles. Further, visualizers, being more image-oriented, have greater
fluency with illustrations, understanding their subtleties, while verbalizers are better at
understanding semantic complexity (Jonassen & Grabowski, 1993; Riding & Ashmore, 1980).
2
Originally, the visualizer and verbalizer concepts were thought to be opposite ends of a
continuum (Richardson, 1977). A person either preferred to learn from visuals or s/he preferred
to learn from words (Jonassen & Grabowski, 1993). More recently, however, this idea has given
way to the view that these concepts are distinct (Antonietti & Giorgetti, 1998; Green &
Schroeder, 1990; Kirby, Moore & Schofield, 1988; Parrott, 1986; Schroeder, 1989). A person
might prefer to learn from both words and visuals; i.e., be a visual learner and a verbal learner.
To bolster their argument, Kirby et al. (1988) showed that Richardson’s Visualizer Verbalizer
Questionnaire (VVQ) did not form a single scale. They derived new scales to measure
visualizing and verbalizing, based on a three-factor solution: a verbal dimension, a visual
1
Riding and colleagues (Riding & Ashmore, 1980; Riding, Burton, Rees, & Sharratt, 1995; Riding, & Sadler-Smith, 1992).


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 5 of 31   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.