All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Religion, Communication, and Social Capital
Unformatted Document Text:  Religion, Communication, and Social Capital --12-- The variables used for the study can be categorized into three groups: exogenous variables (those not influenced by other variables in the model), “antecedent” endogenous variables (those influenced by some variables in the model but that also influence other variables) and our “consequence” endogenous variables. Exogenous variables. Eight variables served as exogenous variables in our model: age, formal education, sex, income, ideology, the denominational affiliation of evangelical Protestant and mainline Protestant, as well as race (white). The measures of age (M = 47.9, SD=17.1) and sex (56.7 percent females) are relatively straightforward. Formal education was measured using seven categories that ranged from eighth grade or less (coded 1) to an advanced degree (coded 7) (M=4.3, SD=1.6). Ideology was a summary measure on the liberal to conservative continuum with 1 representing “strong liberal” and 7 representing “strong conservative (M = 4.4, SD=1.6). Income was measured using 22 categories, with a median income level of $25,000 to $34,999. Race was dichotomous variable, with those respondents answering “white” coded 1 (79.5%), and all others coded “0.” White evangelical Protestant and white mainline Protestant affiliation were dichotomous measures of all respondents who indicated membership in specific church organizations that had been previously classified by Steensland et al (2000). Respondents were first asked a question about their general religious affiliation. For those respondents that indicated that they were Protestant (38.3%), a series of detailed follow up questions probed their specific Protestant church membership. Respondents that reported attending traditionally white evangelical Protestant churches were coded 1 (18.6% of respondents), and respondents that indicated attending traditionally white mainline Protestant churches were coded 1 (14.1%) in their respective variables, with all others coded 0. This other category includes non-Protestants,

Authors: Nisbet, Matthew., Moy, Patricia. and Scheufele, Dietram.
first   previous   Page 12 of 35   next   last



background image
Religion, Communication, and Social Capital
--12--
The variables used for the study can be categorized into three groups: exogenous
variables (those not influenced by other variables in the model), “antecedent” endogenous
variables (those influenced by some variables in the model but that also influence other
variables) and our “consequence” endogenous variables.
Exogenous variables. Eight variables served as exogenous variables in our model: age,
formal education, sex, income, ideology, the denominational affiliation of evangelical Protestant
and mainline Protestant, as well as race (white). The measures of age (M = 47.9, SD=17.1) and
sex (56.7 percent females) are relatively straightforward. Formal education was measured using
seven categories that ranged from eighth grade or less (coded 1) to an advanced degree (coded 7)
(M=4.3, SD=1.6). Ideology was a summary measure on the liberal to conservative continuum
with 1 representing “strong liberal” and 7 representing “strong conservative (M = 4.4, SD=1.6).
Income was measured using 22 categories, with a median income level of $25,000 to $34,999.
Race was dichotomous variable, with those respondents answering “white” coded 1 (79.5%), and
all others coded “0.”
White evangelical Protestant and white mainline Protestant affiliation were dichotomous
measures of all respondents who indicated membership in specific church organizations that had
been previously classified by Steensland et al (2000). Respondents were first asked a question
about their general religious affiliation. For those respondents that indicated that they were
Protestant (38.3%), a series of detailed follow up questions probed their specific Protestant
church membership. Respondents that reported attending traditionally white evangelical
Protestant churches were coded 1 (18.6% of respondents), and respondents that indicated
attending traditionally white mainline Protestant churches were coded 1 (14.1%) in their
respective variables, with all others coded 0. This other category includes non-Protestants,


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 12 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.