All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Religion, Communication, and Social Capital
Unformatted Document Text:  Religion, Communication, and Social Capital --23-- news magazines, and religious news radio may have content specific effects that we are not able to explore within existing data sets. Besides these direct effects through content, religious media may have important indirect effects if religious media use displaces traditional public affairs media use. Our findings indicate that the cognitive dimension of religion is negatively related to political knowledge, secular discussion networks, and the use of public affairs media. To what degree then, do religious media provide support for this retreat by offering alternative news outlets? In addition, there may be important interactions between the effects of religious media and denominational affiliation, religious belief, and forms of religious association on indicators of social capital that are not accounted for in this study. Our findings also indicate that the effects of evangelical versus mainline Protestant affiliation on indicators of social capital are remarkably dissimilar. Future studies, therefore, should explore other aspects of denominational culture that may account for these differences between evangelical and mainline Protestants. These aspects of denomination culture may include cues from fellow congregation members or church leaders, differences in doctrinal belief, and differences in religious practice. Outlook In this study, we found six groups of variables to be of interest in exploring the origins of social capital. These include 1) the associational dimension of religion as measured by church attendance and church-based discussion networks, 2) the cognitive dimension of religion as measured by a respondent’s level of doctrinal commitment; 3) secular discussion networks, and the diversity of discussion networks; 4) media use; 5) political knowledge and political efficacy; and 6) the effects of denominational affiliation, specifically white mainstream evangelical Protestants and white mainline Protestants.

Authors: Nisbet, Matthew., Moy, Patricia. and Scheufele, Dietram.
first   previous   Page 23 of 35   next   last



background image
Religion, Communication, and Social Capital
--23--
news magazines, and religious news radio may have content specific effects that we are not able
to explore within existing data sets. Besides these direct effects through content, religious media
may have important indirect effects if religious media use displaces traditional public affairs
media use. Our findings indicate that the cognitive dimension of religion is negatively related to
political knowledge, secular discussion networks, and the use of public affairs media. To what
degree then, do religious media provide support for this retreat by offering alternative news
outlets? In addition, there may be important interactions between the effects of religious media
and denominational affiliation, religious belief, and forms of religious association on indicators
of social capital that are not accounted for in this study.
Our findings also indicate that the effects of evangelical versus mainline Protestant
affiliation on indicators of social capital are remarkably dissimilar. Future studies, therefore,
should explore other aspects of denominational culture that may account for these differences
between evangelical and mainline Protestants. These aspects of denomination culture may
include cues from fellow congregation members or church leaders, differences in doctrinal
belief, and differences in religious practice.
Outlook
In this study, we found six groups of variables to be of interest in exploring the origins of
social capital. These include 1) the associational dimension of religion as measured by church
attendance and church-based discussion networks, 2) the cognitive dimension of religion as
measured by a respondent’s level of doctrinal commitment; 3) secular discussion networks, and
the diversity of discussion networks; 4) media use; 5) political knowledge and political efficacy;
and 6) the effects of denominational affiliation, specifically white mainstream evangelical
Protestants and white mainline Protestants.


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 23 of 35   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.