Citation

Radio's New Deal: The NRA and U.S. Broadcasting, 1933-1935

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Get this Document | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

This paper describes the political process of implementing the National Recovery Administration (NRA) codes in U.S. broadcasting from January 1933 to May 1935, when NRA legislation was overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court. Through this first New Deal period, the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) sought to maintain its corporate dominance of broadcasting that it won in the the Radio Act of 1927, and later the Communications Act of 1934. The largest U.S. radio networks (the National Broadcasting Company and the Columbia Broadcasting System) through its control of the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), largely steered the NRA code-making process. The NAB Board of Directors developed a set of "war plans' to protect advertisers, agencies, broadcasters, alike from attacks by unfriendly groups. The NAB's principal focus was to protect the advertiser-supported broadcasting system from opposition groups. Though this organization, national broadcasting industry interests usually won out over the concerns of local or small-town broadcasters. Due to a largely cooperative policy that favored President Roosevelt, the radio industry maintained industry control through 1935 over the broadcasting status-quo despite challenges from organized labor groups such as the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers and other organizations that had protested the almost complete commercial re-orientation of the industry. The following key turning points through the 1933-35 period: (1) organization of the Radio Broadcasting Code Authority (RBCA); (2) the establishment of network company unions to thwart independent unionism; (3) announcement of "Code of Fair Competition for Radio Broadcasting".

Most Common Document Word Stems:

broadcast (156), code (107), nab (93), nra (91), radio (85), industri (82), union (66), station (63), u.s (56), labor (52), 1933 (50), hour (47), technician (47), organ (46), nbc (44), compani (42), week (42), would (40), employe (34), work (33), wage (32),

Author's Keywords:

National Recovery Administration, Radio, U.S. Broadcasting, New Deal
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: International Communication Association
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111654_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Mazzocco, Dennis. "Radio's New Deal: The NRA and U.S. Broadcasting, 1933-1935" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111654_index.html>

APA Citation:

Mazzocco, D. W. , 2003-05-27 "Radio's New Deal: The NRA and U.S. Broadcasting, 1933-1935" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111654_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper describes the political process of implementing the National Recovery Administration (NRA) codes in U.S. broadcasting from January 1933 to May 1935, when NRA legislation was overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court. Through this first New Deal period, the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) sought to maintain its corporate dominance of broadcasting that it won in the the Radio Act of 1927, and later the Communications Act of 1934. The largest U.S. radio networks (the National Broadcasting Company and the Columbia Broadcasting System) through its control of the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), largely steered the NRA code-making process. The NAB Board of Directors developed a set of "war plans' to protect advertisers, agencies, broadcasters, alike from attacks by unfriendly groups. The NAB's principal focus was to protect the advertiser-supported broadcasting system from opposition groups. Though this organization, national broadcasting industry interests usually won out over the concerns of local or small-town broadcasters. Due to a largely cooperative policy that favored President Roosevelt, the radio industry maintained industry control through 1935 over the broadcasting status-quo despite challenges from organized labor groups such as the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers and other organizations that had protested the almost complete commercial re-orientation of the industry. The following key turning points through the 1933-35 period: (1) organization of the Radio Broadcasting Code Authority (RBCA); (2) the establishment of network company unions to thwart independent unionism; (3) announcement of "Code of Fair Competition for Radio Broadcasting".

Get this Document:

Find this citation or document at one or all of these locations below. The links below may have the citation or the entire document for free or you may purchase access to the document. Clicking on these links will change the site you're on and empty your shopping cart.

Associated Document Available Access Fee All Academic Inc.

Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 26
Word count: 8935
Text sample:
Radio’s New Deal: The NRA and U.S. Broadcasting 1933-1935 Submitted in consideration for the 2003 ICA Conference "Communication in Borderlands" San Diego California Dennis W. Mazzocco Ph.D. Assistant Professor Hofstra University School of Communication Hempstead New York 11549 Office: 516-463-6462 Fax: 516-463-4866 avfdwm@hofstra.edu 1 Radio’s New Deal: The NRA and U.S. Broadcasting 1933-1935 Abstract This paper describes the political process of implementing the National Recovery Administration (NRA) codes in U.S. broadcasting from January 1933 to May 1935 when NRA
on Expanded Payrolls Shorter Hours As Fatal to Stations " Variety April 3 1934 35; "Union Labor Unfurl its Battle Flags " The Labor Clarion February 13 1933 1. 21 "Wage Raise Would Eliminate Small Stations NRA is Told " Broadcasting May 15 1934 13; "Ask NRA Hands Off Code for Year " Variety May 15 1934 39. 22 According to the IBEW’s brief wage changes would require 42 stations employing 439 technicians to raise workers $4 weekly 182


Similar Titles:
Organizing Workers in the Space Between Unions: Union-Centric Labor Revitalization and the Role of Community-Based Organizations

The Historical Origins of Outsourcing and Union Crisis within the US Auto Industry: Organized Labor’s Self-Determination?

Work As the New Organizing Concept for Labor and Employment Law


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.