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Bridging Offline and Online Community: Toward A Networked Community Communication Model
Unformatted Document Text:  Bridging Offline and Online Community G XY the historical origin and formation of nationalism in his book, Imagined Communities. He assumes that communities including national community are “cultural artifacts of a particular kind” (p. 4) and according to his definition, “the nation is an imagined political community and imagined as both inherently limited and sovereign” (p. 6). The reason for this is described in his following explanation. “It (the nation, mine) is imagined because the members of even the smallest nation will never know most of their fellow-members, meet them, or even hear of them, yet in the minds of each lives the image of their communion”(p.6). Therefore, all communities larger than primitive village in which members can have face-to-face communication are imagined (Anderson, 1991, p. 6). And, in seeing the nation (or community) as imagined one, press media such as fiction, newspapers, play a central role. In other words, newspapers make readers (the public) perceive the nation as a imagined. The most important vantage, Anderson proposes in his discussion, is regarding the role of mass media, especially newspapers in the relationship between the public and community. 5 Friedland and McLeod (1999) proposed answers to this question in multilevel perspectives about the media, especially local media roles within community which is a central realm not just distinguishing the ‘system’ and ‘lifeworld’ created by Habermas (1981/1987), but also in constructing the public sphere suggested by Habermas (1962/1989). A three-level model of the media system and community integration has some useful implications for understanding the relationship between media and community (Friedland and McLeod, 1999, pp. 222-223). 6 First, this model seeks to explain both structure and agent on both a micro and macro level. In other words, it reflects the research tradition in which many 5 While Habermas (1962/1989) thinks that individuals create the public through conversation, Anderson (1991) asserts that individuals are constructed into the public through representation by media. 6 However, a multilevel framework may increase the complexity in studying the relationship between the media and society. One problem still falls into the relationship between media and national (or global) society, and the other is related to the empirical studies.

Authors: Nah, Seungahn.
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Bridging Offline and Online Community
G
XY
the historical origin and formation of nationalism in his book, Imagined Communities. He
assumes that communities including national community are “cultural artifacts of a particular
kind” (p. 4) and according to his definition, “the nation is an imagined political community and
imagined as both inherently limited and sovereign” (p. 6). The reason for this is described in
his following explanation.
“It (the nation, mine) is imagined because the members of even the
smallest nation will never know most of their fellow-members, meet
them, or even hear of them, yet in the minds of each lives the image of
their communion”(p.6).
Therefore, all communities larger than primitive village in which members can have
face-to-face communication are imagined (Anderson, 1991, p. 6). And, in seeing the nation
(or community) as imagined one, press media such as fiction, newspapers, play a central role.
In other words, newspapers make readers (the public) perceive the nation as a imagined. The
most important vantage, Anderson proposes in his discussion, is regarding the role of mass
media, especially newspapers in the relationship between the public and community.
5
Friedland and McLeod (1999) proposed answers to this question in multilevel perspectives
about the media, especially local media roles within community which is a central realm not
just distinguishing the ‘system’ and ‘lifeworld’ created by Habermas (1981/1987), but also in
constructing the public sphere suggested by Habermas (1962/1989).
A three-level model of the media system and community integration has some useful
implications for understanding the relationship between media and community (Friedland and
McLeod, 1999, pp. 222-223).
6
First, this model seeks to explain both structure and agent on
both a micro and macro level. In other words, it reflects the research tradition in which many
5
While Habermas (1962/1989) thinks that individuals create the public through conversation,
Anderson (1991) asserts that individuals are constructed into the public through representation by
media.
6
However, a multilevel framework may increase the complexity in studying the relationship
between the media and society. One problem still falls into the relationship between media and
national (or global) society, and the other is related to the empirical studies.


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