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Bridging Offline and Online Community: Toward A Networked Community Communication Model
Unformatted Document Text:  Bridging Offline and Online Community G X\ He defines the Net as “an informal term for the loosely interconnected computer network that use CMC technology to link people around the world into public discussion” and cyberspace as “the name some people use for the conceptual space where words, human relationships, data, wealth, and power are manifested by people using CMC technology” (p. 5). His definition of community in CMC stresses not the importance of the technological characteristics of CMC, but the importance of the public discussion in personal relationship. With experiences in the electronic community, the WELL, demonstrates how CMC has changed users’ lives. Rheingold also argues that the virtual community revives the interaction lost in modern community. In sum, the online community contributes to integration and construction of solidarity through the public discussion in interpersonal relationships. In a similar vein, by paying attention to the technological attributes of different communication media, many studies of communities in CMC have mainly focused on interpersonal relationships. First, people cannot use the contextual cues transmitted by appearance, gesture, nonverbal signals of the physical context, because people in CMC are unable to see, hear, and feel each other. More specifically, social cues of users are “filtered out” due to the low social presence of CMC (e. g., Walther & Burgoon, 1992). Second, participants can have an equal status across the group members, because features of the public identities, for example, gender, race, and appearance, are not revealed immediately (e.g., Walther, 1992). It is assumed that these positive and negative characteristics of CMC, for example, scarcity of social cues, anonymity, and egalitarianism, affect interpersonal relationships in the online community. These studies about interpersonal relationships have included personal identity (e.g., Turkle, 1995), Usenet Newsgroup (Baym, 1997), Multiple User-Dimesion or Domain (Reid, 1995), and so forth. By extending Cooley’s (1909) notion of primary and secondary relationships, Calhoun (1991) conceptualizes the two kinds of indirect relationships, tertiary and quaternary (pp. 218- 219), applied to mass media mediated and computer-mediated communication. In general, people meet the politicians and imagine the community through mass media mediated space.

Authors: Nah, Seungahn.
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Bridging Offline and Online Community
G
X\
He defines the Net as “an informal term for the loosely interconnected computer
network that use CMC technology to link people around the world into public discussion” and
cyberspace as “the name some people use for the conceptual space where words, human
relationships, data, wealth, and power are manifested by people using CMC technology” (p. 5).
His definition of community in CMC stresses not the importance of the technological
characteristics of CMC, but the importance of the public discussion in personal relationship.
With experiences in the electronic community, the WELL, demonstrates how CMC has
changed users’ lives. Rheingold also argues that the virtual community revives the interaction
lost in modern community. In sum, the online community contributes to integration and
construction of solidarity through the public discussion in interpersonal relationships.
In a similar vein, by paying attention to the technological attributes of different
communication media, many studies of communities in CMC have mainly focused on
interpersonal relationships. First, people cannot use the contextual cues transmitted by
appearance, gesture, nonverbal signals of the physical context, because people in CMC are
unable to see, hear, and feel each other. More specifically, social cues of users are “filtered
out” due to the low social presence of CMC (e. g., Walther & Burgoon, 1992). Second,
participants can have an equal status across the group members, because features of the public
identities, for example, gender, race, and appearance, are not revealed immediately (e.g.,
Walther, 1992). It is assumed that these positive and negative characteristics of CMC, for
example, scarcity of social cues, anonymity, and egalitarianism, affect interpersonal
relationships in the online community. These studies about interpersonal relationships have
included personal identity (e.g., Turkle, 1995), Usenet Newsgroup (Baym, 1997), Multiple
User-Dimesion or Domain (Reid, 1995), and so forth.
By extending Cooley’s (1909) notion of primary and secondary relationships, Calhoun
(1991) conceptualizes the two kinds of indirect relationships, tertiary and quaternary (pp. 218-
219), applied to mass media mediated and computer-mediated communication. In general,
people meet the politicians and imagine the community through mass media mediated space.


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