All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Bridging Offline and Online Community: Toward A Networked Community Communication Model
Unformatted Document Text:  Bridging Offline and Online Community G _ background have contributed to holistic analysis of how urban communities persist and change in the perspective of social process: competition, conflict, accommodation, and assimilation. Zorbaugh (1929/1983)’s classic work, The Gold Coast and the Slum, abides by the theoretical and methodological traditions which had been adopted by sociologists within the Chicago School. First, in terms of theory, he endeavored to understand how a collectivity composed of individuals, for example, native residents and immigrants coming from a variety of cultural backgrounds, sustain social stability and change following Park’s (1915) theoretical legacy of investigation of human behavior in an urban environment. Second, in terms of methodology, he conducted not simply field studies in Chicago, particularly the Near North Side, the Gold Coast and the Slum, but also ‘spot-map’ methods which used survey data based on numbers of juvenile delinquency, suicide, crime and so forth. As Hunter (1997) argues, however, Zorbaugh’s analysis requires replication research to succeed the prior study and develop it in the context of historical change. According to Hunter’s analysis, the spatial and ecological form of the Chicago community still remain although its content has changed over time (Hunter, 1997, p. 109). Unlike Zorbaugh’s argument, he suggests that contemporary field study seeks to find not the role of the private realm, but the role of the public realm in order to construct the real community (Hunter, 1997, pp. 112-114). While Robert E. Park adopted an ‘urbanization’ theory to explain community change, the Lynds’ starting point was the ‘industrialization’ of the late of nineteenth century and the early of twentieth century in America (Stein, 1960, p. 56). Their theoretical approach lead to an alternative explanation of community transformation comparable to urbanization with a political economy perspective. Unlike Marxist, the Lynds believed the division of class and labor is related not to the exploitative relationship between ‘the ruler’ and ‘the ruled’ but the conflictive relationship between ‘the business class’ and ‘the working class’ (Stein, 1960). In the Middletown studies, the Lynds conducted both qualitative and quantitative studies such as participant observation, intensive field study, and statistical analysis. In

Authors: Nah, Seungahn.
first   previous   Page 8 of 31   next   last



background image
Bridging Offline and Online Community
G
_
background have contributed to holistic analysis of how urban communities persist and change
in the perspective of social process: competition, conflict, accommodation, and assimilation.
Zorbaugh (1929/1983)’s classic work, The Gold Coast and the Slum, abides by the
theoretical and methodological traditions which had been adopted by sociologists within the
Chicago School. First, in terms of theory, he endeavored to understand how a collectivity
composed of individuals, for example, native residents and immigrants coming from a variety
of cultural backgrounds, sustain social stability and change following Park’s (1915) theoretical
legacy of investigation of human behavior in an urban environment. Second, in terms of
methodology, he conducted not simply field studies in Chicago, particularly the Near North
Side, the Gold Coast and the Slum, but also ‘spot-map’ methods which used survey data based
on numbers of juvenile delinquency, suicide, crime and so forth.
As Hunter (1997) argues, however, Zorbaugh’s analysis requires replication research to
succeed the prior study and develop it in the context of historical change. According to
Hunter’s analysis, the spatial and ecological form of the Chicago community still remain
although its content has changed over time (Hunter, 1997, p. 109). Unlike Zorbaugh’s
argument, he suggests that contemporary field study seeks to find not the role of the private
realm, but the role of the public realm in order to construct the real community (Hunter, 1997,
pp. 112-114).
While Robert E. Park adopted an ‘urbanization’ theory to explain community change,
the Lynds’ starting point was the ‘industrialization’ of the late of nineteenth century and the
early of twentieth century in America (Stein, 1960, p. 56). Their theoretical approach lead to
an alternative explanation of community transformation comparable to urbanization with a
political economy perspective. Unlike Marxist, the Lynds believed the division of class and
labor is related not to the exploitative relationship between ‘the ruler’ and ‘the ruled’ but the
conflictive relationship between ‘the business class’ and ‘the working class’ (Stein, 1960).
In the Middletown studies, the Lynds conducted both qualitative and quantitative
studies such as participant observation, intensive field study, and statistical analysis. In


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 8 of 31   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.