All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Radio's New Deal: The NRA and U.S. Broadcasting, 1933-1935
Unformatted Document Text:  12 The NAB’s proposals for the radio codes were still considered temporary by the NRA because of genuine concerns about whether the NAB represented the interests of all radio station owners. It certainly did not include all stations as dues-paying members, for example. A quorum of stations would prove vital, however, especially given organized labor’s argument that the NAB’s influence had to be restrained because the lobby organization did not represent all economic interests in the industry. Deputy NRA administrator Rosenblatt was also concerned about the value of the NAB proposals since the association did not include all 604 U.S. radio stations as members. In its defense, the NAB, through its president Alfred McCosker, claimed that "from an economic standpoint, radio was still a minor industry." As the NAB would later do with great success, when it favored the interests of large or "chain" broadcasters, the trade group championed the rights of small and local broadcasters in its barrage of public relations appeals. McCosker pleaded with the NRA to allow the financial reality of small stations to guide national code making policy with regard to wages, work schedules, and other business affairs. He said that such smaller stations were the backbone of localized community broadcasting (albeit with smaller revenue possibilities). While this was essentially true, McCosker did not say that very few of these small community stations, if any, had ever had any meaningful influence or power in shaping NAB policy. The latter continued to be dominated by the most powerful stations and nationwide networks. Challenging the NAB position, T.R. McLean, in charge of organizing radio for the IBEW, reported that he had signed union cards from broadcast technicians in practically every large city in the U.S., including New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles. McLean pressed the issue of a 40-hour week, for a $40 per week salary. He also demanded double-time for hours worked in excess of 40 hours. McLean made the argument that the IBEW found many stations working their operators some 84 hours per week at "beggars’ pay." He also demanded employment compensation insurance for those injured or disabled in the performance of their duties--not an unusual occurrence at the time.

Authors: Mazzocco, Dennis.
first   previous   Page 13 of 26   next   last



background image
12
The NAB’s proposals for the radio codes were still considered temporary by the NRA
because of genuine concerns about whether the NAB represented the interests of all radio station
owners. It certainly did not include all stations as dues-paying members, for example. A quorum of
stations would prove vital, however, especially given organized labor’s argument that the NAB’s
influence had to be restrained because the lobby organization did not represent all economic interests
in the industry. Deputy NRA administrator Rosenblatt was also concerned about the value of the
NAB proposals since the association did not include all 604 U.S. radio stations as members. In its
defense, the NAB, through its president Alfred McCosker, claimed that "from an economic
standpoint, radio was still a minor industry."
As the NAB would later do with great success, when it favored the interests of large or
"chain" broadcasters, the trade group championed the rights of small and local broadcasters in its
barrage of public relations appeals. McCosker pleaded with the NRA to allow the financial reality of
small stations to guide national code making policy with regard to wages, work schedules, and other
business affairs. He said that such smaller stations were the backbone of localized community
broadcasting (albeit with smaller revenue possibilities). While this was essentially true, McCosker
did not say that very few of these small community stations, if any, had ever had any meaningful
influence or power in shaping NAB policy. The latter continued to be dominated by the most
powerful stations and nationwide networks.
Challenging the NAB position, T.R. McLean, in charge of organizing radio for the IBEW,
reported that he had signed union cards from broadcast technicians in practically every large city in
the U.S., including New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles. McLean pressed the issue of a 40-hour
week, for a $40 per week salary. He also demanded double-time for hours worked in excess of 40
hours. McLean made the argument that the IBEW found many stations working their operators some
84 hours per week at "beggars’ pay." He also demanded employment compensation insurance for
those injured or disabled in the performance of their duties--not an unusual occurrence at the time.


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 13 of 26   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.