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Radio's New Deal: The NRA and U.S. Broadcasting, 1933-1935
Unformatted Document Text:  16 working hours in a largely successful effort to maintain independent union-free workplaces. There were a few more minor clauses added as well, such as one allowing stations to claim hardship if the NRA wage minimums or hour limitations proved too much to bear financially. 16 Temporary Radio Code Broadcasting Authority (RCBA) The temporary Radio Code Broadcasting Authority (RCBA) began formal operations on December 11, with a group of ten men overseeing implementation of the plan nationally. The NRA considered the code as an industry organization, but not a trade association. This was a key distinction in that the NAB did not represent every U.S. radio station (or even a clear majority, for that matter). At this time, NAB-membership totaled some 315 stations, slightly operation at the time; most of these were network-owned or -affiliated stations. Had the NAB been a trade association made up of every radio station, the RCBA would have been permanent, with a great deal more power to institute code changes in the workplace. At the opening meeting of the temporary code authority on December 11, NAB Managing Director Philip Loucks expressed hope that within 90 days sufficient stations would sign up with the NAB to allow the temporary code authority to become permanent. Under terms of the temporary operating plan, there were nine voting members from the industry and three non-voting members (to be appointed by the President.) William Farnsworth, assistant to Deputy NRA administrator Sol A. Rosenblatt, was assigned as the NRA’s presence (and by extension, President Roosevelt’s) on the scene. At the first meeting, John Shepard IIl, Yankee network president was named chair, and John Elmer, WCBM Baltimore, was named vice-chairman. (As mentioned previously, James W. Baldwin was named director of the Code Authority and served as the RCBA’s only paid executive.) The expenses for running the RCBA came from a small tax (.02 %) placed on the net sales of all stations per month. The rest of the code authority present that day besides Shepard, Baldwin, and Farnsworth: M.R. Runyon, CBS treasurer; Frank. M. Russell, NBC vice-president (in charge of Washington lobbying

Authors: Mazzocco, Dennis.
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16
working hours in a largely successful effort to maintain independent union-free workplaces. There
were a few more minor clauses added as well, such as one allowing stations to claim hardship if the
NRA wage minimums or hour limitations proved too much to bear financially.
16
Temporary Radio Code
Broadcasting Authority (RCBA)
The temporary Radio Code Broadcasting Authority (RCBA) began formal operations on
December 11, with a group of ten men overseeing implementation of the plan nationally. The NRA
considered the code as an industry organization, but not a trade association. This was a key
distinction in that the NAB did not represent every U.S. radio station (or even a clear majority, for
that matter). At this time, NAB-membership totaled some 315 stations, slightly
operation at the time; most of these were network-owned or -affiliated stations. Had the NAB been a trade
association made up of every radio station, the RCBA would have been permanent, with a great deal more
power to institute code changes in the workplace.
At the opening meeting of the temporary code authority on December 11, NAB Managing
Director Philip Loucks expressed hope that within 90 days sufficient stations would sign up with the
NAB to allow the temporary code authority to become permanent. Under terms of the temporary
operating plan, there were nine voting members from the industry and three non-voting members (to be
appointed by the President.) William Farnsworth, assistant to Deputy NRA administrator Sol A.
Rosenblatt, was assigned as the NRA’s presence (and by extension, President Roosevelt’s) on the scene.
At the first meeting, John Shepard IIl, Yankee network president was named
chair, and John Elmer, WCBM Baltimore, was named vice-chairman. (As mentioned previously, James
W. Baldwin was named director of the Code Authority and served as the RCBA’s only paid executive.)
The expenses for running the RCBA came from a small tax (.02 %) placed on the net sales of all stations
per month. The rest of the code authority present that day besides Shepard, Baldwin, and Farnsworth:
M.R. Runyon, CBS treasurer; Frank. M. Russell, NBC vice-president (in charge of Washington lobbying


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